Electric screwdrivers

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I'm def no expert, but in case it helps here's my experience and some tips...
Last January, I bought a Makita 8391DWPE3 18V Combi Drill from Screwfix. At the time, it was on offer for 80 (and hence free delivery). It's no longer on the screfix site - and is probably superseded anyway.
But my choice stemmed from...
- 18v (I've found anything less a bit feeble)
- 3 batteries (which I use in rotation - don't leave one unused for months on end)
- Variable speed
- Hammer action when needed
- Screwdriver with adjustable torque clutch thingy
- Key-less chuck
- Tough case - with space for screwdriver bits etc.
Completely satisfied so far...!
Avoid those makes which don't sell batteries separately - I got caught out previously by B+Q's "in-house" make - had to discard drill completely once battery died.
Definitely worth spending extra for tough screwdriver bits, but you'll only appreciate this if you buy some cheap ones first :-)
And obviously use cross-headed (eg philips) screws whenever possible.
One other thing I've learned (others here will know this, but I didn't...) masonry bits (as well as "ordinary" drill bits) go blunt...! They don't look or feel blunt, but well worth replacing periodically.
HTH
--
Martin




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Martin wrote:

Yeah... but...
Replacement battery for mine is pushing 50 quid. So it sits in the drawer, gathering dust. Check the prices of the replacements, as well as the availability!
Andy
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Andy Champ wrote:

Unless you spend a fair bit a combi is not very good as a hammer drill, better to get a 12v drill driver and a (say) 600w SDS for holes in hard walls. If you use a mains drill to drive screws, take care as it's dead easy to snap the heads off.
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You are spot on with the 18V Makita it's a superb bit of kit as are the twin 14v versions, I got the B&Q promoted ones, the 18V included a huge accessory kit and two batteries. The 14V twin kit is stll in store at under 90, not sure about the 18s Someone mentioned screwdriving using a drill but this is gash and not really to be recommended except for the odd job. You need a drill/ diver with torque control otherwise you risk snapping off the screw head or the driver bit. I would always recommend buying the best quality tools that you can afford as cheap tools cause frustration when you find out they are not up to the job. An 18v cordless driver will tighten screws far more than you could ever do by hand.
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AJH wrote:

For me, I prefer a 12v drill driver for diy as it is smaller and easier to get into tight spaces like kitchen and bedroom cupboards etc. I still don't think that a DIY grade battery combi is much good for drilling holes in brick & block walls and a 600w SDS is so much faster.
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The 12V type are ok but the Makita 14V ones are the same size as a 12V but more powerful. I've got several drills/drivers and they all come in handy at times depending on the job, the Quattro mains drill is only used for when some brute force is needed drilling largish holes in stonework or concrete, I've got a B&D 9v angle drill/driver, 14V Makita combi. 14v Makita drill/driver, 18V Makita combi. They all get used!
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AJH wrote:

You can't have too many drills :-)
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
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