double-glazed pane replacement cost

Hello,
I have been affected by this week storm and my bedroom window has been broken by a flying piece of roof. Fortunately, it's double-glazed and only the external pane broke. I've been to the local glazier this morning but they are on holiday until next week. I'm tempted to leave it like that until then but have a few quick questions for reassurance: 1) is it risky to leave a double gazed window with just a single pane as it is for the moment? 2) I have the feeling that it's not worth claiming this back to the home insurance: I think I have a excess of 150 or 200 (Have to check), and the maximum no claim discount (10 years plus, non protected). Could someonme give me a rough estimate for such a repair? It's the bottom panel of a wooden sash window (the "classic" Edinburgh tenement window), double-glazed, dimensions are 112cmx64cm (or 44" x 25"). The glass broke in tiny little pieces, like a car windowscreen, is that "Pilkington security glass"? In that case, I can see the advantage....
Many thanks
Gogo
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It's toughened glass. Windows of certain sizes and positions have to use toughened glass, so that if they get broken accidentally, there are no large pieces to drop out and cut your arm off, or similar serious injuries.
If the windows were installed since April 2002, then the replacement will need to meet Part L (e.g. Pilkington K glass). If the windows predate April 2002, then this is optional, but you should make it match whatever it was before, or that glass pane will look different colour from the others. The date may be written on the glazing spacer, if the glass hasn't been replaced before.
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Andrew Gabriel
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[Default] On Thu, 05 Jan 2012 09:29:04 +0000, a certain chimpanzee,
wrote:

The window itself is fine (think how many houses have single glazed windows). The risk is that it may make your property look abandoned and a target for thieves or vandals, so it depends on how good an area it's in.

A similar sized unit in laminated glass cost me 246 last year. That's in a uPVC window, so fitting was a ten minute job. IIRC, that also included the late night call out to board up as well, so probably take 50 off that.

It's toughened glass (not just Pilkington). A requirement (in England & Wales at least) where it's at low level. Stronger than normal float glass, but it can be breached. Security glass is usually laminated.
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Hugo Nebula
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Thanks Andrew and Hugo, very useful information!
I forgot to say that I live on the third (top) floor, so, no real danger of vandalism! I just asked about the safety of it in case for some reason a double-glazed window with just one single layer would be somehow more "unstable" of at higher risk of breaking...
Windows were installed in November 2002, so, I guess they need to be Pilkington K and toughened (but not necessarily laminated).
Thanks again
On 05/01/2012 09:29, gogo wrote:

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