DIY Plumbers

I am quite sure that many people have come across this at some time.
You want to replace the taps on the bathroom basin. You don't wish to get a plumber in for financial reasons or fear of getting well and truly ripped off (they're not all crooks), so you decide to have a go yourself......
An easy job, or is it.?
Disconnecting the water pipes is easy, providing you have remembered to turn the water off first. You have one of these:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)07187765&sr=8-2
and one of these:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)07187816&sr=8-7
some of these:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)07188169&sr=1-7
and finally, one of these:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)07188342&sr=1-25
but, you still can not get up inside the basin to the tap fixing nut because all the tools you have seem to be too big or is it the basin isn't big enough, and the tap itself will not turn on the sink.
Apart from smashing the sink, which kind of defeats the object of the excercise, how does one get the illusive tap fixing nut off.
Would love to know how others approach and solve this problem.
By the way, it is not a job that I am embarking on, but one I have come across before.
Kindest regards,
Jim
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wrote:

Box spanner - obviously you tighten the tap in position before connecting the pipework.
http://shop.ebay.co.uk/i.html?_nkw=box+spanner+taps&_sacat=0&_odkw=box+spanner+tpas&_osacat=0&_trksid=p3286.c0.m270.l1313
32mm for basin taps, 36 mm bath taps
Sometimes you can use large sockets directly, but usually need deep sockets.
And you can put a socket & ratchet over the other end of the box spanner for easy tightening.
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Or rather because DIY actually stands for "do it yourself"
Can't really advise however, since I only had such a problem with bath taps and it was just a matter of frigging and farting about until I succeeded
--
geoff

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Friends of my wife had four plumbing jobs to do - a day's chargeable work. That was change the electric shower (like for like as the old one had failed), replace bath and basin taps and sort out the piping to the outside tap.
Two plumbers quoted - neither turned up. I got volunteered and as a DIY plumber did the job well inside the working day and got payment that was good for me and probably good for the payer. The only investment I did make was a set of tap box spanners which made dealing with tap nuts so much easier.
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On 05/06/2011 15:06, the_constructor wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)07187816&sr=8-7
Usually I have been able to get at them with one of these - offered straight up, and using something else in the other end to turn it.
However, if there is no room for that, you will need a tubular spanner - a bit like the ones used for monoblock taps or immersion heaters, but about halfway between them in size ;-)
--
Cheers,

John.

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On 05/06/2011 15:06, the_constructor wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)07187765&sr=8-2
(Amazon.com product link shortened)07187816&sr=8-7
(Amazon.com product link shortened)07188169&sr=1-7
(Amazon.com product link shortened)07188342&sr=1-25
You spend an outrageous sum of money on a set of these;
http://www.screwfix.com/p/armeg-jaw-dropper-plumbing-wrench/99190?cm_mmc=GoogleBase-_-Datafeed-_-Tools-_-Armeg%20Jaw%20Dropper%20Plumbing%20Wrench
They are worth every penny. You can have mine when you pry them from my cold dead hands....
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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http://www.screwfix.com/p/armeg-jaw-dropper-plumbing-wrench/99190?cm_mmc=GoogleBase-_-Datafeed-_-Tools-_-Armeg%20Jaw%20Dropper%20Plumbing%20Wrench
At 50, it is easy to see where the jaw-dropper name come from ;-)
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My solution was a bit cheaper but probably just as effective. I turned up a couple of S/H Snap-On "crows-foot" spanners on e-bay in the US - and pushed the ratchet, extension bars and UJ from a knackered old 3/8ths socket set back into service. I now have one HELL of a tap spanner!
I think I paid about $13 for each including postage - which is a bargain really as Snap-On stuff fetches silly prices over here, even when used.

http://www.screwfix.com/p/armeg-jaw-dropper-plumbing-wrench/99190?cm_mmc=GoogleBase-_-Datafeed-_-Tools-_-Armeg%20Jaw%20Dropper%20Plumbing%20Wrench
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wrote:

I thought that USAnians used "wrenches" rather than "spanners" ;-)
--
Frank Erskine

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My sincerest thanks to all who contributed to this thread and the advice.
T'was a wonderful experience.
Kindest regards,
Jim
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On 05/06/2011 15:06, the_constructor wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)07187765&sr=8-2
(Amazon.com product link shortened)07187816&sr=8-7
(Amazon.com product link shortened)07188169&sr=1-7
(Amazon.com product link shortened)07188342&sr=1-25
I use one of these and have yet to run into a problem:
http://www.wickes.co.uk/taptool-universal-spanner/invt/420064 /
Colin Bignell
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I have one too, and I've found very little that they actually fit!
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On 05/06/2011 20:34, Farmer Giles wrote:

It works well enough on taps and is cheap enough to replace when I forget where I put it between plumbing jobs.
Colin Bignell
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Fair enough, but I have honestly found it next to useless. It must be me!
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On 06/06/2011 08:56, Farmer Giles wrote:

No. I found mine useless as well.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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On 05/06/2011 15:06, the_constructor wrote:

You may be able to use a regular open ended spanner but used incorrectly i.e. just off vertical (as the pipe/tap is in the way) If you need more leverage (which you have now lost due to using spanner in wrong plane) just fix an adjustable on to the spanner shaft/handle..
You may only get a fraction of a turn but reverse the spanner(s) and take another tweak. Finger-loose/tight is just a tweak away..
Sometime plain old gas pliers will get the job done too.
or tighten from the top... i.e. restrict nut movement and twist tap to tighten then adjust.
8O
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Roger Mills wrote:

Indeed, and I use the service valves (or other appropiate compression joint) as the mechanical disconnection point as well. To access the tap stems I undo the service valves and lift off the sink.
I've just replaced the sink cabinet in the shop kitchen today and being able to disconnect the pipework just under the bowl instead of 12 inches above the back of the bowl made it a piece of cake.
JGH
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wrote:

You can buy tap spanner exactly for this purpose. the spanner bit is perpendicular to a long shaft so yo ucan rech right up into the basin and grip the nut. Search for "tap spanner" on ebay and you'll find many types. With these you can tighten the nut while the tap is still connected to the pipe.
Robert
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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
saying something like:

No, you just shut off the valve at the bottom of the hot cylinder that's on the feed pipe. If, of course, it isn't seized or broken.
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On 12/06/2011 02:05, Grimly Curmudgeon wrote:

Which if its a gate valve - is probably seized or broken - poxy things.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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