Decorating Problem (2) - Wood Clad Ceiling


The same friend as with the cork tiles (see previous post) also wants their kitchen ceiling painted white. Currently it is varnished T&GV timber, a sort of antique pine colour, in quite good condition. They just want it white emulsion, complete with V joints!
How should I prepare the varnished wood for painting with ordinary (vinyl) emulsion, or should I be using some other sort of paint?
Any advice much appreciated.
David.
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DavidM wrote:

things.
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DavidM wrote:

Sanding would be best but a hell of a job sanding into all the grooves (above your head) - maybe one of those paints for rejuvenating kitchen units would stick to the varnish better?
The ceiling is also quite likely to be greasy so a good going-over with a long-handled mop might be a good idea.
Owain
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Owain wrote:

It only needs keying so a flexible sanding block would get into the grooves and be reasonably quick then the rest can be lightly sanded with an electric sander.
Emulsion would work but a water based matt/silk paint specifically for wood might be better. If you do use emulsion try using a water based wood primer first.
Mike
Mike
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I would use sugar soap and give the ceiling a good scrub with it using a long handled deck brush, this will be much easier than sanding and leave the surface slightly "tacky" which will be suitable for emulsion paint. I have used this twice now on pine clad ceilings and it's worked for me!
regards,
David
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On 10 Feb, 22:39, "David" <.> wrote:

Consider a light wash coat instead, much nicer, Brush on, wipe off immedaitely.
NT
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You need to lightly sand it with medium / fine green paper. Just a wipe over will do -ten minutes max. Wipe with a dry duster and apply knotting. Knotting is a resin that seals the natural resin in the knots in pine.
A coat of good quality vinyl, then matt eggshell will do the job in a few hours. I would use the eggshell (though not necessary) as wood will discolour fairly quickly; especially in a bathroom.
Don't piss around applying oils to a ceiling as it will drip pdq if you go slowly. Put it on thick and fast then spread it out and of, wiping the brush out continually.
You can get rollers for oils and they are worth it even though you aught to throw them away if not going onto another job with them in a day or so.
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On Wed, 07 Feb 2007 19:49:35 GMT, DavidM wrote:

I had exactlt this sort of problem when I moved into our present place, a tgv matchboarded ceiling in the kitchen, it had been varnished and acquired quite a few years of cooking and smoking stains.
I had a pro decorator come in to do it.
He washed it down with sugar soap - amazing how much grot that removed! Washed off with plain water, next an application of slightly thinned plain white emulsion as a base coat, then final coat of satin vinyl. That was ten years ago as it's still absolutely perfectly. No sanding at all, but he washing down was messy.
The TGV comes down later this year when the kitchen is being remodelled! Hoo-bloody-ray! :-)
--
the dot wanderer at tesco dot net

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The Wanderer wrote:

I think you mean T&G, not TGV :-)
Have you any idea what's *above* the T&G, befor eyou bring it all down?
Owain
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Owain wrote:

We've got a really bad plaster board ceiling, with previous holes for ceiling lights and a speaker.
Shudder.
When we took our friends false ceiling down from her kitchen to make it level with the dining room, horror of horrors, there was hardly any previous ceiling left! It was lath and plaster with massive holes, two of them at least 3 feet across. Electric cables danglig across the whole void, so they had to be re routed, and plumbing pipes just casually winding their way along, and they had to be sorted too.
So, guess what went back up?
Oh dear...
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