Cutting / fitting skirting board


I've just had my kitchen replastered and I'm planning to fit some new skirting board over the next few weeks. I was going to buy a tool for cutting the edges, and wondered if this was the right thing?
http://www.screwfix.com/search.do ;jsessionid=ICDKUK3LYNYI4CSTHZOCFFI?_dyncharset=UTF-8&fh_search=psm210jsl
Looks like a good deal and I assume its the right tool to get 45 degree angles on the skirting edges for corners. If anyone has any tips / saw recommendations I'd be most grateful
Cheers
James
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James wrote:

http://www.screwfix.com/search.do ;jsessionid=ICDKUK3LYNYI4CSTHZOCFFI?_dyncharset=UTF-8&fh_search=psm210jsl
Wow, me, at the most I would just use one like this:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId 35557&ts4812&id927
Generally available for under a tenner...
Whatever you use, the biggest risk is splintering the wood - the angle is not really that critical and any gaps will be easy to fill. If you aren't used to sawing wood, a handsaw taking it gently is possibly a better tool than an electric thing that will have it done in a flash, right or wrong..
--
Sue

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get to your nearest B+Q or homebase or whatever and get yourself a cheap mitre block and a cheap saw ... probably cost about a tenner for the lot and then just go for it with that, i've done pretty much the whole house here using that.
one thing to rememer, if your joining 2 pieces of skirting on a straight (long) wall then do the mitres there too and th joint will look a lot better, 2 mitres of the opposite direction will fit together in a staight line if you see what i mean
50 quid seems way too much just for this job, not worth it unless you have a load of other things needing done
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Unless you have other uses for the electric one then I would go for the cheaper version. I use the cheaper one and get excellent results.
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Hi James
I've had joiners do skirting and they don't mitre the joints. They join at right angles or whatever angle the walls meet. What they do is each piece has a straight edge cut at 90 degrees and the other end is profiled with a coping saw to the same profile as the skirting. I have done this and I am surprised how easy it is. Just trace the profile from an end onto the one you want to cut and use a coping saw to cut to the profile. Its surprising how imperfections in the cut are not seen as bad as a badly fitting mitre. If you are painting, then the filler will hide really bad cuts. If you are leaving natural, then I think you will get neater joints than mitres. This of course only works with inside corner joints , outside joints will still need to be mitred.
Dave

http://www.screwfix.com/search.do ;jsessionid=ICDKUK3LYNYI4CSTHZOCFFI?_dyncharset=UTF-8&fh_search=psm210jsl
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On Wed, 02 May 2007 23:21:58 +0000, dave wrote:

We call that a butt-and-scribe and it's only done on an inside corner. If the face of the section of skirting to which it is butting is off plumb for whatever reason it makes for a tight join in an internal corner. Instead of using a combination square, set a sliding bevel guage against the face of the first piece of skirting. Transfer that angle to the piece of skirting you wish to cut, then set your mitre saw (hand or power) to cut the skirting at 45 degrees from front to back and offset to match the line you've drawn. After that, run a pencil along the angle where the front of the skirting board and the cut meet. This will highlight the profile where you have to cut with the coping saw.
Don't cut the profile square to the face of the skirting board, angle it slightly away so that when you butt the newly cut piece (piece 2) to the fixed piece of skirting (call it piece 1), only a sharply cut edge of piece 2 touches the face of piece 1. Depending on what kind of finish you intend to put on the skirting board you can decide whether to fill any slight gaps or adjust your butt joint on piece 2 to leave no gaps.
Hope this makes sense :-)

External corners are, as you say, just mitred, but again depending on how plumb the wall is and how near 90 degrees the corner actually is. There are simple ways to cut tight mitres in skirting board for external corners that aren't a proper right angle (they very rarely are, especially in older buildings).
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hi toolstation are offering the same saw for 24.99 liz
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