Cutting box profile steel sheets


Has anyone ever tried cutting these sheets with an angle-grinder?
I am going to build myself another shed using box profile sheets for the roof. To make best use of the area that I have to site it, the rear of the shed would run at an angle of around 24 degrees from the sides - although the front and sides of the shed would be at right-angles to each other, one side would be longer than the other by about 3 feet 6 inches.
To make it look reasonably presentable,and have an even overhang at the rear, I would need to cut the sheets across their width at the stated angle. I know it is possible to cut them in this way, but is the end result likely to be acceptable?
If not, could anyone suggest a better material for the roof - at a similar cost?
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Farmer Giles wrote:

I would suggest a metal cutting disk in a circular saw. Use a length of ply + backrail guide to run the saw on, clamped to the sheet. Don't rush the cut and it will come out fine.
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Palindrome wrote:

A good suggestion, I think I'll give it a try on an old sheet that I've got.
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Depends on what you call acceptable. Not aesthetically pleasing maybe, but who will be looking at the rear? I haven't seen it done quite like this, but years ago I knew someone who built an L shaped shed to fit the available space.
Steve
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shazzbat wrote:

Unfortunately, and I forgot to say this, the shed will at the front of the house and the cut part running along the hedge against the road, so the look of the thing is quite important.
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Then the answer is to grow wisteria or clematis along the edge.
Steve
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shazzbat wrote:

Growing plants is not an option in the intended position. Besides, neither of those two plants would be very effective in the wintertime!
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The tool that's used is called a "nibbler" most tool hire depot have them. If you use any kind of grinding tool the heat damages the protective plastic or galvanising surface. The hire company will should ask you what thickness the material is and give you the correct cutter.
By the way what was the out come of the re roof of your friends bungalow.
Keith (Nottm)
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keith_765 wrote:

Thanks, Keith, I'll check that out. My friend is going to have taken roof taken off again and a breathable membrane fitted - without ventilation. At the moment he is looking round for a suitable roofer - certainly not the one who did the original job! - he is in Birmingham, fancy giving him a quote?
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On Thu, 26 Apr 2007 20:04:58 +0100, Farmer Giles wrote:

==============================If you're near a branch of 'Wickes' have a look at their 'Bitumen corrugated roofing sheet' (Black or green available). It's easy to cut with an old wood saw but a bit expensive at 8.49p per 6' x 3' sheet. I don't know how that compares with the box profile sheets you have in mind but ease of cutting might tip the balance.
p.s. You *can* cut the box profile and other metal corrugated sheets with an arc welder but it's not a very clean cut.
Cic.
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Cicero wrote:

I have a small shed already roofed with that stuff from Wickes, and I can't say that I would recommend it. As you say, it's easy to cut and fit - but, unless the roof has a fairly steep pitch, it does require a lot of support otherwise it sags very badly and a nice little pool of water forms. It might be worth considering in this instance if I change my plans a wee bit and build an apex roof.
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