CORGI engineer required to install new radiator?

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On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 00:16:39 +0100, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

It's getting to the point where people will have to notify BCO if they want to wipe their backsides!
Last year we had a gas fire replaced & a flue liner installed. Guess what, BCO had to be notified and I was issued with a pretty little certificate. FFS why should the BCO be involved?
Don.
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So that they can increase their workload, hire more of them and reduce unemployment while increasing taxation.
did anybody hear the Radio 4 item about the Purbeck bedroom tax yesterday?
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On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 09:00:39 +0100 Andy Hall wrote :

Yes, a Conservative council, for anyone who expects things to change in 2010
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Tony Bryer SDA UK \'Software to build on\' http://www.sda.co.uk


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On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 12:14:41 GMT, Tony Bryer wrote:

I was going to call it 'daylight robbery', but that was the "Window Tax" of 1696. Oh well, that's progress for you. ;-)
Don.
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Cerberus . wrote:

The window tax is a scam run by FENSA these days ;-)
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

It in theory requires a building notice because of the Part L requirements for energy efficiency - hence verification of the effiency of the boiler, plus checking that the controls are to modern standards with TRVs and boiler interlock etc.

That seems quite common. I noted on the Ideal boiler I fitted at the last place, there were instructions in effect saying everything is preset, please don't fiddle!
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Should I apply for this retrospectively? I'm pretty certain it exceeds current requirements - weather compensated etc.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave, it's your choice. When you come to sell the house there is a standard question on the buyers form, from their solicitor, which asks if the central heating has been altered from a certain date. If you say yes (which you would have to in your case), then there is a follow up which says please supply BCO completion certificates (electrical and gas) and CORGI certification. If you don't have that then the buyer can either use it as a reason to knock you down on price or even pull out of the deal altogether if it worries them that much. The BCO retrospective fee if 20% on top of the normal fee. From the buyer's point of view, the fact that there is no 'legal' paperwork for the installation can invalidate any insurance claim they might make in the future and of course they would have the same problem when it comes time for them to sell.
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    clangers snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk writes:

In my (admittedly limited experience of two recent cases), the seller's solicitor doesn't allow you to answer any of these questions, even where apparently favourable to you.
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Andrew Gabriel
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Sure, the buyer's solicitor can't legally force you to answer the questions but, what would you as the buyer think if you outright refused to answer those sticky questions? You'd immediately assume (correctly) that there's no paperwork or that you're hiding something or both. Either way, answering honestly that you have no paperwork or alternatively just refusing to answer, you're in the same boat. The buyer tries to knock you down on price or walks away.
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On 2008-06-13 12:35:39 +0100, clangers snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk said:

One could simply answer that there is no paperwork and that none is required. It isn't.
Then the buyer can choose. If they want the house they can choose to ignore the issue (because it is a non issue) and then check that their solicitor really knows what she's doing (if she got this wrong how much more is wrong?)
If it's a price issue and a negotiation then that will have to be about something else.
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Andy, are we talking about the boiler replacement or my original question about the radiator? If you are talking about the boiler replacement, where are you getting this idea that no paperwork is required from? Can you refer me to a legally binding document that states this, something that I could refer the clueless solicitor to when they (or the buyer) insist on BCO completion certificates and CORGI paperwork?
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On 2008-06-13 13:34:11 +0100, clangers snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk said:

Specifically the radiator not boiler replacement.
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

No point now... If you sell the place and it proves to be a problem, you can get a (worthless*) insurance to cover retrospective building regs problems.
* IIUC the window of time where a LA can take any enforcement action on building regs violations is short, and since your system complies anyway there would be nothing for them to take action over. That even assumes they had the will - which seems unlikely.
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OK. I've no intention of selling - I wouldn't have replaced the boiler if I had.

Great. I put in a larger window at the same time. Wonder what I've not done that I should have with this. ;-)
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Nothing to worry about then...

Same thing... building regs Part something or other (I lose track of the alphabet soup of pointless regulation that has flowed forth in recent years). You need to be a member of FENSA or go the building notice route to replace a window. (although you can repair one with impunity however)
(stats suggest that to all intents and purposes no one bothers taking any notice of this one).
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My Keston said something along those lines. It was however miles out, as I think was everyone else's here.
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Andrew Gabriel
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On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 22:35:26 +0100 Dave Plowman (News) wrote :

I'm about to find this out, since I replaced mine in 2004 and am about to sell. I am (hopefully) going to pre-empt problems by getting it professionally serviced and get a Landlord's certificate at the same time. For the electrics, I will get a periodic inspection report. If I have an awkward buyer ['s solicitor] they may insist on a Building Regs regularisation approval which will cost me 250 or so for nothing more than eyeballing the other paperwork.
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Tony Bryer SDA UK \'Software to build on\' http://www.sda.co.uk


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When I sold my house, in which the boiler had been replaced a few years earlier, the buyers (via their solicitors) asked for paperwork from recent servicing of the boiler.
I told them, not untruthfully, that I had never had my boiler serviced and therefore I had no servicing paperwork to give them. They asked again and I told them the same thing. They then asked whether it worked OK, and I said to the best of my knowledge yes (which it did).
That was that. I was prepared, if pushed, to get it serviced and pay for it, but I didn't think it was worth servicing it on the off chance.
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On 2008-06-11 11:29:14 +0100, clangers snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk said:

There's nothing to tell him.
You will not have done anything that requires notification to any official body or involvement by any pseudo official body like CORGI.
However, if you feel that having a piece of paper from one of these organisations (which you wouldn't get for a radiator change anyway), then hire a registered fitter to do the job.
You are concerning yourself about nothing.
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