Consumer Unit

I have an older Edwardian house. The present consumer unit is about 6 feet above floor level wired in pvc red/black, probably done in the 70s and added to in early 90s. Everything rings out fine. I want to replace the unit with a modern one containing MCBs and RCBs. I've been told that to comply with new regs I have to have the unit moved to be more accessible without step ladder. This causes a tremendous amount of work as the nearest place is about twelve feet away that is suitable probably requiring meter move and upheaval to other domestic items plus redecoration. Is this true that the regs require retrospective action, I thought that if the house had been wired to previous regs of the past that no retrospective application of requirements are enforced..
Thanks in anticipation.
Dave
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On 19/02/2014 00:18, Dave wrote:

Cross-posted for better info.
Andy
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Vir Campestris wrote:

Whoever told you that does not know the Building Regs.
It is an existing installation, so long as you dont make it worse than it previously was, then there is no problem at all in leaving it at the present height.
New builds and major renovations have to have their switchgear/ socket outlet etc at a suitable height. As a guide, the heights of between 450 and 1200mm from the ground are given. This is not law, it is a guide.
Common sense (should) prevail. You will have to make sure your earthing and bonding complies with current standards if you change it. And be aware of maybe a shared neutral on your hallway/landing light.
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On 19/02/14 23:09, A.Lee wrote:

IIRC consumer units do NOT have to comply with disability regulations. Nor do lightbulb sockets ;-)
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Ineptocracy

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Thanks for all replies it is as I thought from my little knowledge of the regs.
Whats the problem with shared neutrals, I presume the rcds won't function properly or trip unexpectedly,? I might have more in my house because of wiring changes through the ages to support outside lights and central heating with thermostats and motorised valves all over the place. Does each seperate circuit need its own isolated neutral then to go to its corresponding rcd.? I might see the problem if I do a few squiggles on paper..

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Hi
Sorry for being thick it's obvious you can't balance the live and neutral currents if there are stray neutral or live cross connections between the RCDs, especially not to 30mA unless the cable runs are closely impedance matched.


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Hi
Sorry for being thick it's obvious you can't balance the live and neutral currents if there are stray neutral or live cross connections between the RCDs, especially not to 30mA unless the cable runs are closely impedance matched.


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