Cistern problems

Hi,
I've had a toilet installed by some bathroom fitters a few weeks ago and I flushed it this morning and the cistern didn't stop refilling with the water just running into the toilet bowl. After a bit of poking around I discovered a few things:
* There is no isolating valve on the water pipe to the cistern. Is this required as I would expect as it's gravity fed from a huge tank in the loft? * They didn't connect up the overflow! (I'm assuming for now that the toilet it replaced had one connected)
I've temporarily fixed it for now by jamming a tool into it in such a way that it thinks the cistern is full.
I guess my question is just whether or not they should have fitted a valve to the supply pipe, my other half bought all the bits (was her project) and probably should have bought one of those but I would have expected them to mention it ;)
For humour value I'll mention that I checked the other bathroom that was fitted before we moved in, the toilet in there has a valve on the supply line but it's so close to some tiles it's impossible to close it as the tap handle would have to move through the tiles. Also the heated towel rail in there has a blanking plug at the top where it should have a plug with a bleed valve! Grr.
Thanks,
Peter.
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Peter Spikings wrote:

AFAIK there is no requirement to fit an isolating valve and in the situation of having parts supplied by the customer, then there is a suggestion that one is not wanted.
It is a requirement that cistern overflows give an obvious indication of a problem so they may not be plumbed into a drain. Fitting a tundish would meet the requirement but is not decoratively acceptable to most people in a domestic situation. The normally accepted solution is to plumb the overflow into the flush pipe and then the water can be seen running into the bowl continuously. Presumably this is what you are seeing.
hth
Bob
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Peter Spikings wrote:

It's not required - but it's sheer laziness not to fit one, they are dirt cheap these days.

Many modern toilets overflow into the bowl so there is no need for an external overflow. I recently completely replaced my bathroom and whereas the old toilet had an overflow pipe going out through the wall, the new toilet just overflows into the bowl. The new types of non-syphonic flush mechanisms allow for this.

It's usually a simple screw, or sliding bracket, adjustment to set the water level.

Over the years I have fitted isolating valves to every tap, the shower inlets, and both toilet supply pipes in my house. It's just a common sense thing to do and means you can work on individual taps or toilets without having to turn the entire water supply off. You could fit one yourself very easily and there are even 'push fit' isolating valves now so no need even for compression joints and olives.

It it's a compression fitting you should be able to slacken off the nuts at both sides of the valve and just swivel it around and re-tighten. Turn off the water before doing this!
Also the

There's usually a blanking plug on one side and a plug with vent valve on the other side.
--
Kev


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You cistern should be fed from the rising cold main, NOT from a tank.
--
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com
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Why?
Peter
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I would have thought both would be acceptable, but if the water in the tank contains any debris, that could get into the inlet valve and might cause it not to seal properly, with a resulting overflow.
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On 13/10/2010 20:55, Peter Andrews wrote:

Yes, why?
Rob Graham
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On 24/10/2010 09:57, Rob Graham wrote:

Indeed. The second flood in my son's flat was caused by mains pressure forcing off a feed pipe to a cistern. It would have flooded a lot slower from a tank. And we have a downstairs toilet fed straight from mains, the main feature of which is it's damn noisy.
Andy
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From your last comment it would appear that there is a problem with the siphon, rather than overflowing. This would be unusual in a new installation. Or that the flow into the cistern is insufficient, which in turn would suggest that it is fed from a tank rather than the rising main. Fitting an isolator in the feed pipe would allow you to set the feed rate at less than the flow into the pan, but this is curing the symptom rather than the defect.
Have you tried mentioning it to the installers?
Steve
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