Chainsaws


OK, I've just taken a couple of trees down Taking out the root ball, I';ve had to cut the roots near the soil I was carefull not to bury the saw but I guess a bit of muck got into the blade
Thing is, only an hours use on a new blade and its blunt ! did the soil cause the dramatic speed in blunting the blade ? (Oil etc all topped up and ok) Thanks
--
Vass



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Vass wrote:

Yep. Almost instant. Bugger, innit? Cheers Gilbert
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Vass wrote:

Definitely. Always keep a chainsaw away from soil (if possible).
--
Howard Neil

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idea to touch the ground with one of these beasts. :(
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Its one of the many things you get taught at chainsaw school.
Thats why you always leave a stump, and never cut off at ground level.
A pro chainsaw man always carries a spare chain or 2 or 3
Also beware of nails, staples, barbed wire etc etc that has been left embeded in a tree from fencing etc.
If you hit one of these not only do you instantly blunt your chain, but you also have a loose bullet flying about.
Safety gear all the time.
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Getting a chainsaw blade in contact with soil will blunt it fairly quickly, but blades will often be blunt after an hour's use cutting certain types of wood. Also the blades on a poor quality chainsaw will need sharpening more often than on a decent make (Stihl, etc). Sharpening the blade is a quick and easy job though - come back if you want any advice on the process.
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Thanks for comments McCullock, replacement chains are 15 so I'll go down this route and keep away from the soil Cheers
--
Vass



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Vass wrote:

The chain will still need frequent sharpening. If you throw them away as soon as they go blunt they will cost you a fortune. If you are not sure how to sharpen a chain, just ask here. There are several people who would be able to advise.
--
Howard Neil

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It doesn't need replacing, only sharpening, you don't even need to remove the chain from the saw to sharpen it. If you want to know how to sharpen the chain just ask.
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Round file with plate showing angles on it 6.99 Thanks
--
Vass



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Yes, but the file has to be the right size for the chain , and it is also important that the teeth are filed at the correct angle. Both these parameters should be found in your saw handbook. Put the chain saw on a flat table, or bench, and apply the brake. Wearing a strong pair of gloves, hold the chain saw with your left hand (if you are right handed) - so that the engine is on your left and the chain on your right - and file at the correct angle in the forward direction only. File each tooth in turn until you have gone all round the chain, then turn the saw through 180 degrees and do the other side. After you have sharpened it check the chain tension - this can be adjusted by a screw on the body of the saw just underneath the chain.
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