ceramic hob


After Christmas I am going to install a new kitchen as I am to retire at the beginning of January and can take my time doing it.
However, this morning I dropping a wooden chopping board on top of the electric hob and cracked the ceramic (glass?) cover
It is all still firmly in place and still works.
However, as I cant start work on the new kitchen until January, would it still be safe to use it until then ?
The hob is at least 15 years old so a replacement cover is doubtful.
many thanks
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Neil wrote:

House insurance?
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Thank you for that advise, it never crossed my mind, and I have checked and I am covered. I wonder how many people overlook this.
Back to the original problem, whilst I sort this out, I would still need a cooker and would seek some guidance as to whether the hob would be dangerous to use whilst cracked

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Neil wrote:

The crack could allow water from a boiling pan to enter also the glass is weakened so a heavy pan could break it.
I had a crack running diagonally across the glass of my free standing cooker. I was told by the manufacturers (Creda) you can't replace the glass. I used it for a week or so until the replacement cooker arrived, I was just careful to avoid heavy pans and made sure I didn't allow any spillages.
The crack ran across one of the rings and I didn't use that one, I had no problems but there are clear risks.
Although you could claim on your insurance might a a cheap replacement be cheaper bearing in mind your excess and possible increase next year? You could even get a more expensive model and fit it in your new kitchen. They aren't difficult to fit/wire and most seem to be similar in size.
Mike
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matter - will it cost you more in the long run to claim?
--
Chris Green

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"Neil" wrote:

It would become dangerous if a pan boiled over and water was able to leak through the crack and make contact with live parts. Otherwise, as far as I know, it should be safe. If you claim on your insurance it could be January by the time the claim is processed and before someone comes to fix it, assuming that a replacement ceramic panel is still available. They may have to replace the hob. You would have to pay any excess, and they may increase your next premium if it turns out to be a hefty claim.
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Many thanks for all the advise.
The crack is over one ring and it would be rare that we would need to use it

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hob, dropping a kitchen unit on it.. As it was going to be a while before he got round to the cooking half of the kitchen he got a cheapy ceramic hob from TLC direct (90, end of line model) and fitted that. Finally replaced it with a nice Neff induction hob and flogged the old one in the free ads for 60.
He is now currently arguing about Part P, the electrician who fitted the hob added a new 32A radial was Part P self certifying and says house holder gets no paperwork as he self certified. Council building control say he should issue test certificates etc etc, meanwhile my mate is stuck in the middle with two people interpreting Part P differently.
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Get you friend to find out who the electrician is Part P registered with and get him to contact them directly with his complaint
Adam
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In fact thinking about it I am in the same boat, had kitchen fitted (May), yes extended rings for new sockets etc, new oven radial and I don't remember seeing any certifying paper work !!!!
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There is also Trading Standards. We are not talking about competent DIYers who choose to ignore the part P but electrical firms.
Adam
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Spoke to fitters they said they have been on the Part P course are certified as competant and did perform all the necessary electrical tests and install wiring as per BS???? (didn't catch that bit) and can self certify and no they don't issue paperwork to customers or building control for minor works.
Spoke to building control. Yes they should issue minor works installation and test certificates. How ever there appears to be generally a problem with workers whose main business is not electrical ie builders/fitters. Apparently 100's of builders/fitter etc atteneded courses pre Jan 2005 and were told (incorrectly) that they could test and self certify without issuing paperwork or informing building control in a similar way to Gorgi for gas work. Even major kitchen fitting firms have been affected by this, just assumed could go on Part P course get competance certificate and carry on as before not issuing paperwork and not informing building control.
Also building control are having issues with fitters doing the job, writing certificate and passing to their management who then just send a list of "we have done works at...." to council with no description of work. Appears to be an issue again with non-electricians. They did state that Part P, of which they have to obey and follow, appears to have not been thought out very well to cope with the large number of workers who do notifiable electrical work as part of their job rather than electricians who generally appear to be doing it right in issuing correct paperwork and informing building control.
So still doesn't help my mate or me.
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