Cable for cable TV


What cable do Telewest run from the box on the outside wall to their decoder on the inside?
I need to lay some whilst the ceiling are down so that if I ever get cable TV (or a TV) there will be no mess to the decorations.
Thanks
Adam
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"ARWadsworth" wrote:

Try uk.tech.digital-tv
Phil
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ARWadsworth wrote:

any unavoidable sharp bends/ change in direction.
--
Sue



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Adam
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It's simple 75ohm high quality coaxial cable, in the main. You'll have to fit 'F' sockets or plugs to appropriate ends, rather than normal coax arial(sp??) ones.
I'd suggest a trip to a local Maplins or Comet store for information pertaining to your particular area (just in case you're maybe very rural or live in a coastal area, you might require stronger signal/non-erosive materials?)
remember to consider future networks, RF, broadband, home cinema, and any DAB needs, that may have to come from the cable installation in future?
John -- Remove 'spamfree' and replace 'at', to reply
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It's simple 75ohm high quality coaxial cable, in the main. You'll have to fit 'F' sockets or plugs to appropriate ends, rather than normal coax arial(sp??) ones.
I'd suggest a trip to a local Maplins or Comet store for information pertaining to your particular area (just in case you're maybe very rural or live in a coastal area, you might require stronger signal/non-erosive materials?)
remember to consider future networks, RF, broadband, home cinema, and any DAB needs, that may have to come from the cable installation in future?
John
--
Remove \'spamfree\' and replace \'at\', to reply

Distance should not be a problem.. The green telewest box that supplys the
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You might want to consider doubling up on the co-ax. The o/p from our NTL box (I assume TeleWest is similar - esp now they've merged) is split into "TV & BB" and FM radio - giving loads of extra radio channels.
One other thing often forgotten - mundane but frustrating - is a door-bell wire!!
--
Martin

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RG59 or any double screened 75 ohm coax

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Ooops! in my rush to reply to your initial enquery on wires, I forgot to mention considering buying 'F' Connector signal splitters.
These generaly come in two (one input, two outputs) or five (1 in, 5 out) options. They're easilly obtainable from either Homebase or Maplins in the UK shouldn't cost more that 8.00 each @ top whack and can be 'piggy backed' (the lead from one can be the input lead for another two or five set, up to 15 connections in total in most houses, no flex being longer than 5 metres though!) for larger networks throughout the home. If there's to be more than 15 units conected throughout the home, consider fitting a reception booster (electrical, connected to mains) at the first connection coming into the home and possibly the first connection to the upstair too?
An example is .... a five way splitter in the living room fixed to the lead from the external, this lead works as main 'input'. Connect tv, hi-fi, video, cable or satellite(sp??) and modem to four, of five outputs, then, one other output to a 5 metre cable leading to a stair cupboard. The other end fitted off with a two way splitter which provides tv and video/modem or other connection upstrairs, when drilled through cupboard ceiling, upstairs floor boards. this is a simple example, the two way splitter could just as easilly be a five way one to allow greater flexibility upstairs for families with teens etc.... boosters should be used @ every 10 metre length for max output!
There are other more expensive options with control panels available using especially designed network boxes. They might be appropriate as you're doing major refits. Speak to an arial installation expert for advice on these options? They're simply a glorified, often tidier and somewhat heavier duty version of what's described above.
John -- Remove 'spamfree' and replace 'at', to reply
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