brush or roller


I have a large room to paint, luckily it is not very high cos I cant cope with tall rooms. It is at the moment painted deep red emulsion , seeing as how it is going to be a toddlers room I don't think that will do at all so it will probably need two coats of a more suitable colour. I am an oap - god how I hate saying that - and am trying to think what is the best way of doing the painting, I prefer a brush but might a roller be quicker and if so what sort, a fluffy one or the sponge sort, any advice is appreciated
kate
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Best way, get someone else to do it. Otherwise, use a roller. Much quicker than brushing.
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I agree that roller is quickest and probably best; I have used them for years and find that the "fluffy" ones are much better than sponge.

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I agree. Does anyone know a quick way to wash them out though?
JW
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John Whitworth wrote:

Buy a pack of em from screwfix and chuck them away Before anyone says environmentaly unsound, just consider the amount of detergent & hot water and all those resins that go down the sink drain when you wash them out.......
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True enough I guess. I will look into getting some cheaper ones. I'd got stuck in the Stanley roller trap, and they always seemed too expensive to be just dumping.
Will the Screwfix ones fit the Stanley roller handle do you know?
JW
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John Whitworth wrote:

screwfix do 9" & 12" but most are 1&3/4" diameter whereas your frame is probably 1&1/2" so be careful what you buy. Of course you can get a new Stanley roller cage for less than a fiver. Extra Harris rollers are 5 for 7.33.
You need never wash them out again.
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I think you have removed a small part of the pain of decorating for me! :-)
Thank you.
JW
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I always put them in the washing machine (short cycle). They come out clean as a whistle and (presuably) using a lot less water than cleaning by hand!!!
Cheers
John
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On Thu, 3 Dec 2009 00:08:01 -0000, John wrote:

Even less waste if you have some clothes of the same colour to go in with them.
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John wrote:

Interesting idea, but if my wife caught me putting painty rollers in the washer the pain would be immediate & terrible........
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I'm an OAP too, and have decided to help my son by doing some repainting in his new house for Xmas present (no cash but loads of time - you know what I mean ..!).
I've found the best way is to "cut in" with a brush (i.e., round edges, sockets, corners, etc.) then use a roller for the main area - I've also found the yellow foam one works well and spreads easily - I tried the fluffly ones and they didn't work as well. Plus it's easier to wash out afterwards.
I've always resisted using rollers - I don't really like them - but I'm finding that this is speed and efficiency for large areas. You can do a wall in a few minutes, once you've done the edges.
And use good quality paint, not the cheapest you can buy. It does make a difference. Also, I'd suggest a good coat of white as a base coat over the red - this has worked in said son's house where there are some horrid colours and he wants magnolia. It also shows up all the little imperfections which you may want to fill / sand down.
Good luck!
Barb
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Just some advice from a DIY no-hoper who always learns what NOT to do, I found I got a better result by doing the wall in sections rather than cutting in the whole wall or room and then rollering. Maybe the cut-in parts had started to dry, but I ended up with a noticeable ridge where the brush and roller met. If I did it in smaller sections (cut in with brush, fill in with roller etc etc), it blended perfectly.
Obviously if you can get someone to help, one of you can brush and the other can roller, you can finish a wall in a very short time.
Another tip I learned the hard way is to prepare the room properly... not just the walls but moving/covering furniture, masking off sockets etc so you get a clear run at all the walls in one go. If you don't have to worry about dropping a bit of paint or climbing over furniture/dogs/children, your job is much more enjoyable.
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I fully agree with the comment on preparation; I painted a bedroom recently using the roller. I had prepared evrything with masking tape including door surrounds, top of skirting, fittings etc and there was then no problems of having to cut in around these.

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not

I wouldn't mask off the sockets. I would remove the screws and leave them hanging and paint round them. Taking out and then replacing two screws with an electric drill is far quicker than masking - plus you get a better job.
Rob Graham
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On Tue, 1 Dec 2009 17:03:26 -0000, "Mentalguy2k8"

I think a common problem is that if you cut in with a brush, you can leave evidence on the wall of the brush and the roller painting. I find that a brush will put on more paint than a roller. I slightly dilute with water the paint that I am cutting in with, to avoid the difference. l
Mike P
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On Tue, 01 Dec 2009 13:11:25 +0000, Kate Morgan wrote:

=============================================== I think there's a strong case for brushing as opposed to roller. A roller can produce a surprising amount of fine spray especially the foam type which is likely to cover you and anything else within range such as ceiling, windows etc. A lot of cleaning may be necessary when you've finished with the roller. A roller also has a tendency to slide over the wall (rather than rolling) leaving unsightly blemishes. Brushing is much more controllable and probably uses substantially less paint.
However if you do decide to use a roller don't overload it with paint as it will be difficult to get an even coat.
Cic.
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I agree with the roller approach ,having been involved with the building trade most of my life have not seen any decorators using a brush to paint walls for years. Personally I hate decorating but when SHMBO demands I use a cheap imitation B&Q lambs wool roller (about 4.00 inc tray and spare roller) .A trick I was given is ,as already posted ,to cut in with a brush as you go.This avoids colour mismatch.Also spread the paint very thinly on the first coat (doesn't matter if it doesn't seem to cover ) then let it dry for a few minutes and give it a second coat. As for removing electrical outlets I would say no, you are opening a can of worms ,especially in older properties and whilst fast don't use a battery driver .If the screws are tight or rusted they could snap off. Much easier to stick masking tape around the outlets and safer. If you must clean the roller fill an old bowl with warm water and a bit of washing up liquid using rubber gloves rub the roller under the water to remove the paint then rinse under warm water. Very un-eco friendly and only works with water based emulsions.Me I just wrap 'em in newspaper and bin 'em. HTH CJ

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...

Thank you all very much for help and advice, I am at the moment using a brush as there are several bitty places to paint round windows beams etc but tomorrow I have two big plain wall`s and I intend using a brush on one and a roller on the other to see which one I get on with best. I have plenty of paint and time so we shall see what we shall see, thanks again
kate
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