British Gas Jobsworth

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That's spooky! I am the OP, when the Gas Man went to change the meter (and didn't) he also said the meter was slightly tilted and could have been recording incorrectly and that my tenant may be due a refund. BTW my Corgi man is going in this week to sort it out, so the BG / Transco / National Grid or whoever can then change the meter.
Cheers
John
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I have had a bill from my CORGI man taday, 60 all in, he has piped MY side in fixed copper so there shouldn't be an issue from now on as far as BG etc are concerned!
Thanks for all the replies but I still think the world has gone mad!
Cheers
John
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On Sat, 19 Jan 2008 12:41:30 -0000, a particular chimpanzee, "John"

Interesting (well, to me anyway). Within the same conversation we have two different terms for cash-in-hand work.
In Liverpool and Manchester (and presumably, the North West), it's known as a 'foreigner' or 'doing a foreigner' [1]. When I lived in Yorkshire, it was a 'guvvy' apparently derived from 'Government Work'. In Somerset it's known as a 'PJ' for 'private job'.
Are there any other regional variations?
[1] It doesn't come from Irish at least. I remember I was with a colleague from Ulster who didn't know what I meant when I was speaking to a member of the great unwashed in Liverpool about 'doing a foreigner'. I suspect 'doing a foreigner' in the early 1990's in her part of the world might have meant something different and would involve a lot of plastic sheets and a JCB.
--
Hugo Nebula
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There are really two versions of this. One is where the job/project is done for AN Other for cash or other favours, under the tax radar. The other where it is something done as a project for oneself using one or more of employer facilities, time or materials.
In my early career in electronics, the latter were known as Home Office Projects or simply Homers. Actually they were encouraged within reason because they often involved trying things out that would later be of benefit to the company.
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Andy Hall wrote:

I have worked on projects where engineers have managed to knock up a variety of company funded extras like this. Things ranging from a radio controlled car, to a fridge built from parts!
--
Cheers,

John.

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The famous one at MSDS was John xxxxxx who booked in an empty metal box as a mixer and booked it back out a couple of weeks later as ... a 48 channel mixer
Good bit of gear too
--
geoff

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I'm from Lancashire, and my Father worked at 'Leyland Motors', man and boy. Using the company facilities & materials for making projects for home was a 'foreigner', and I grew up surrounded by them!
I later worked in academia in Yorkshire, and the equivalent amongst the technicians and mechanics was a 'guvvy' or a 'guvvo'. I heard a few stories from the days of the late sixties; one included them managing to put together a Mini on the fourth floor of the Physics Building!
Down on the South Coast I hear of 'homers'.
J^n
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In message

Foreigners were always for someone else, homers for you
--
geoff

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[...]

in *your* experience; not in mine.
J^n
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In message

Well, yes, that's why I said it
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geoff

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Hugo Nebula wrote:

I find that sort of thing interesting as well.

Never heard 'guvvy' or 'PJ' in common use in the south east or London. PJ would indicate pyjamas if anything. Rarely heard it called a foreigner either. 'Cash in hand' is a common term.
More common would be phrases like 'there's a drink in it for you' or 'I'll give you a drink'.
Then of course there are variations; a drink, a good drink, a large drink etc.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
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randomly hit the keyboard and produced:

I was once offered "the wife for the night" in return for some work. I declined as I do not accept predecimal currency.
Adam
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ARWadworth coughed up some electrons that declared:

did the currency in question know about this proposition?
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PJ is common round here - and at my work.
--
*Husbands should come with instructions

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 15:38:54 GMT, "The Medway Handyman"

"Yenormous Wodkas" and maybe a banana daiquiri, if you're an aging Grauniad reader...
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randomly hit the keyboard and produced:

I find it interesting as well.
The term "foreigner" is alive and well in Yorkshire although it tends to mean using your firms tools (and most probably the parts as well) to do a job that the firm have never seen (eg. my aprentice wiring his nextdoor neighbours extension). The term "private" is used in the same way.
It is a long time since I heard "guvvy" used and I have lived in Yorkshire nearly all my life. That phrase tended (IMHO) to be used as the extras that the sparks/plumber did whilst at work for cash in hand (the new light fittings, outside taps etc). The "guvvy" work was usually done in the firms time as well.
Adam
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On 2008-01-20 16:02:14 +0000, "ARWadworth"

I always thought that it meant someone from Lancashire :-)
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Andy Hall wrote:

No, thats 'Alien' Andy.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
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On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 16:02:14 +0000, ARWadworth wrote:

================================='Cash-in-hand' is often used for payments made to casual labourers on farms, building sites etc. I think this kind of workforce was referred to as 'the lump' when it was employed in the building trade.
'Cash-in-hand foreigner' (a bit of a tautology, really) or just 'foreigner' seems generally to mean a tradesman or other worker using either or both his firm's time and tools /equipment to do a job for someone which isn't authorised by the firm, without the knowledge of the firm and for which the firm gets no part of the payment.
Cic.
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Personally, I don't have the FAINTEST idea what any of you are talking about
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geoff

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