British Gas Jobsworth

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wrote:

Well ,ever reluctant as I am to be pedantic ,you did not say
"that the BG employee had an easy *opportunity* to offer such an arrangement but did not do so"
you said
" and he declined the opportunity to do a 'cash-in-hand' foreigner"
It could be argued that if it wasn't offered then it couldn't be declined . :-)
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On Sat, 19 Jan 2008 14:41:03 +0000, wrote:

=================================It could indeed, if you have a penchant for nit-picking , as you clearly have.
Cic.
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Using Ubuntu Linux
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On Sat, 19 Jan 2008 12:41:30 +0000, John wrote:

Doesn't NEED doing: according to regs (which I CBA to dig out ATM) you're not allowed to do new lead pipework for gas but lead piping currently in service is OK to leave in (provided it's in OK condition, natch). I suppose there may be some argument when changing a meter since that there's a risk of disturbing the lead and inducing a leak but I'd be inclined to challenge them to either say (and justify) that the installation is currently At Risk due to the pipework or accept that it isn't (or at worst is Not to Current Standards, which doesn't require a request or demand to shut off appliances or service) and replace the meter.
Or if you don't want the hassle get a RGI in to do it. If I were doing it it'd prpbaby cost you about £65.
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John Stumbles

I\'d give my right arm to be ambidextrous
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I'd share your frustration.
I suspect the part you want is on this page http://www.bes.co.uk/products/036.asp
Personally I'd get the part, book another BG visit, and offer the guy a tenner to install it when he changes the meter.
David
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On Sat, 19 Jan 2008 13:33:51 +0000, Vortex wrote:

No, that's an 'Anaconda' used on the supply side of the meter. Occasionally seen on the installation-pipework side, but the kosher way to do that side is simply an appropriate bit of copper pipework, usually 22mm. You'd probably want a BES P/N 0981 or 0977 from     http://www.bes.co.uk/products/037.asp (+ washer, sold separately) to connect to the meter
--
John Stumbles

The floggings will continue until morale improves
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OP here, will this not cause another 'problem' though? If I get my CORGI man in (I am awaiting a call back after the weekend) to replumb in fixed piping, i.e. not flexible, and then BG jobsworth comes back and the new meter is a different size will he not do it or will he presumably alter 'his' side of the pipework to suit. I just cannot see why he couldn't do it at the same time and get BG to bill me!
Just to clear up any mis-understandings that there may be from other posters, I was NOT asking for a 'cash in hand' job, the supplier of gas to the property is BRITISH GAS (tenants choice), and I have spoken to BG call centre and after what seemed like hours on the phone was told it wasn't their responsibility and couldn't help, I needed to "get a CORGI registered engineer in, and the call us back to arrange a meter change".
As a side issue as BG wont work on MY side of the meter how and why do they carry out boiler services etc?
Cheers
John ( No. 1 )
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

I assume that your CORGI man will still fit a *flexible* pipe - the only difference from the existing one being that it won't be made of lead. So there shouldn't be a problem in attaching a new meter to it.
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Cheers,
Roger
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wrote:

But according to Mr Stumbles (if I read it correctly), my side should be piped in solid pipework not flexi.
John
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It doesn't matter, because only one side needs to be flexible anyway.
Moreover, meters for domestic use (E6, U6 I believe) have a standard distance between the fittings (152.4mm) to facilitate easy swapouts by meter monkies.
Take a look at www.bes.co.uk and under the sections under Natural Gas --> Meters and you will see meters, brackets etc. listed. Really all you need to do is call the CORGI man, explain that you will have a new meter fitted, but that you need him to sort out the pipework on the user's side of the meter.
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wrote:

= 6 inches?
:-)
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Frank Erskine

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On 2008-01-20 15:10:16 +0000, Frank Erskine

No. Much more...
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wrote:

No a flexi pipe on the user side is ok and can in fact be desirable depending on location of meter and soundness of the wall it will be fitted to.
John
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On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 08:36:50 +0000, John wrote:

No, the meter will be the same size (at least it's inlet and outlet connectors will be). The industry is not that stupid! :-)
--
John Stumbles

I used to be forgetful but now I ... um ....
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I didn't mean the diameter of the inlet and outlet, I meant the distance between them. One other thing I remember now from the conversation was the BG man said "This is occurring more and more because of the new regs", so WHY don't they (BG/National Grid) tell them to change it at the same time as the meter change and bill the customer, obviously tell them the cost first etc. As I am a landlord this would show up at my next Gas Safety Check but how many people out there have gas inlet pipes (their side) made from lead? They wouldn't know it was against current regs until they need a meter change, which if they had a new meter 12 montha ago, it would be 14 years away, my tenants meter needs changing as it is 15 years old! The BG man said the lead piping wasn't a safety hazard only against current regs. I will await the call from my CORGI man and let you know the outcome.
Cheers
John
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On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 22:59:25 +0000, John wrote:

That is what I meant. Sorry it wasn't clear.
--
John Stumbles

I used to be forgetful but now I ... um ....
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I sympathise But as you are a landlord just get a Corgi in to replace the pipe and do another gas safety inspection. You know it makes sense !
{John number 4 by the looks of things}
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i had a gas meter moved no more then 4 feet cost me 500 they ( BG) connected it to thier gas main but i had to get a corgi guy to connect the meter to the house main as BG dont get involved in connections to the house side of the meter.
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

The world's gone mad - largely due to privatisation which has split the responsibility for everything between numerous parties!
When my previous house has built (in the late 1960's) the builders (or maybe the Gas Board?) installed a capped-off pipe in the garage, which was connected to the gas main. The builders installed another pipe alongside it which was connected to the gas points in the house. We didn't initially use gas, until I installed a central heating boiler. Whereupon I requested a supply from BG (probably the West Midlands Gas Board in those days) and they came along and installed a meter - and supplied and installed 2 short lengths of lead pipe to connect the meter to the 2 pipes mentioned above. I imagine that was standard practice.
So why all this rubbish about everything downsream of the meter being the owner's responsibility, when it was very likely installed by BG (or their predecessors) in the first place.
When I moved into my current house in 1977 (also built in the late 60's) there were lead pipes either side of the meter - just like the previous house. The one on the consumer side is still there! The one on the supply side was changed a couple of years ago by contractors working on behalf of BG - or maybe Transco - who were replacing the cast iron gas main with plastic. I think they also changed the meter, but can't remember for certain. Nothing was said about the lead pipe!
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Cheers,
Roger
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lead is fine on existing installations but not for new...flexible connections are not normally used on both in and out going because the meter can apparently be slowed down by tilting the meter, the normal way is 22mm copper on the out going... before anyone asks im corgi registered...
wrote:

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On Sun, 27 Jan 2008 18:57:07 +0000, nobby wrote:

Which way do you have to tilt it?
Just for interest, like ;-)
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