Boarding a floor


Hi,
I have a 1st floor room with older (100 yrs) floorboards, with large gaps between. I'm going to carpet the room, but before this I'm going to screw down loose boards to the joists. I'd also like to board over the floor so as to give the most flat surface on to which the underlay and carpet can be laid and cover over the large gaps between the floorboards.
My question is what to use. I thought about hardboard, nailed to the existing boards. Any reason why this would be a problem? The only thing I could think of was if a drink was spilled, the moisture soaks through the carpet and underlay and softens or warps the hardboard beneath, distorting the shape of the floor beneath the carpet. How does hardboard react under such circumstances? Would I be better off with marine ply?
Any advice on how I should go about this?
Thanks.
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JustMe wrote:

I did this all wrong. I used hardboard, nailed to the boards as you suggest. It must be something to do with relative expansion coefficients, but the hardboard developed "bubbles" at times of the year and lifted the carpet up with it - you couldn't see anything but it gave a very strange feeling to walk on..
I live in an old (c 1680) house with solid stone walls and no foundations or dpc - which could have been the cause. The floorboards were very worn in places, with gaps that you could see through. I asked a builder and he said that, whilst the whole lot was safe, the floor would have to be replaced. The cost would have been .. a lot.
I replaced it with ply, not nailed down, but floating. I used a Wolf dovetailer to dovetail the edges and "jgsaw" them together into one single floating piece and glued the joints. I laid the assembly on a heavy-duty poly sheet - to stop the draughts coming up from the cellars, directly underneath. It hasn't given me any problems at all in many years.
I wouldn't say that was the right way to do it. But it seems to have worked.
--
Sue



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| Hi, | | I have a 1st floor room with older (100 yrs) floorboards, with large gaps | between. I'm going to carpet the room, but before this I'm going to screw | down loose boards to the joists. I'd also like to board over the floor so as | to give the most flat surface on to which the underlay and carpet can be | laid and cover over the large gaps between the floorboards. | | My question is what to use. I thought about hardboard, nailed to the | existing boards. Any reason why this would be a problem? The only thing I | could think of was if a drink was spilled, the moisture soaks through the | carpet and underlay and softens or warps the hardboard beneath, distorting | the shape of the floor beneath the carpet. How does hardboard react under | such circumstances? Would I be better off with marine ply? | | Any advice on how I should go about this? | | Thanks. | | Well I used quarter inch ordinary ply, I used screws and raw plugs to fix it down on to concrete. The idea was to lay hard wood tiles around the edge upto the skirting and doing this saved me money! I then layed carpet down in the centre to cover, am I a skin flint or what? However it worked very well and I dont see why it would not work covering up floorboards. I'd use screws instead of nails because If the nails should come loose they could squeak. You would not want to use marine ply as its frightfully expensive and after all.....how many drinks are you going to spill? Unless you have a paddling pool indoors! :-)
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JustMe wrote:

If you use hardboard, soak it (I have used a very wide emulsion brush to apply water at pint per 16 sq ft )before nailing,allow it to stretch (48 hours laid flat in the room the board is to be laid in)then nail it down it will dry out drum tight, mind you profesional floor layers seem to use thin ply (eigth inch?)
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as
Thanks for all the tips and advise. I'm off to B&Q tomorrow :)
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'Soup' is right. Floor layers now use thin ply instead of hardboard as it does away with all this soaking and shrinking business. Mind you, using oil tempered hardboard is the answer as it is ready to lay straight away and comes in nice 4x2ft sheets but is expensive.
ken
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Is t+g chip board still used? Did my kitchen a few years ago in the same manner as my parents house. T+G chip board over polystyrene over plastic membrane. Made the room warmer and the floor quieter. Also eliminated sound coming from the flat below, and doubtless reduced noise travelling down too.

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