Best Way??


My Mum wants me to put up some long (8 foot) shelves up, using contiboard and 4 shelf bearers per shelf, lots of books on them!. Which is the best way to get the shelf bearers level? With a shorter length shelf I would fix one bearer and then using the shelf and the other bearer I would adjust to level and mark the holes. With the conti board being so long it will bend under it's own weight so I don't think this method will work. Any more ideas?
Cheers
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John wrote:

LOL, stand the shelf on edge, rather than flat. You can let it tilt back a little, so it stays in place.
--
Sue


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Palindr☻me wrote:

Yes, but press it flat when youre drawing the line, as even at a small angle it'll bend about.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't know if it's relevant to hanging long shelves at, say, 20" intervals....letting you peeps know, when I popped in -earlier- this week, my Netto had cheap picture-frame-hanging spirit levels for sale. About 700mm long, with in-line marker holes set above the ruler. Some possibly left over are hopefully still around in other stores. Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John wrote:

Yes, a laser ruler held in position on the wall while you stand back to view the level of the line.
--
Sir Benjamin Midllethwaite



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John wrote:

Hmmm... 8 foot, 4 brackets, that's a minimum of 2 foot spacing. If you do that with conti board then put books on it, it will sag muchly.
--
Grunff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Grunff wrote:

I make it 32 inches between bracket centres. Sag even more. But how thick is contiboard? One inch thick would be OK. I have a plain timber bookshelf 3 foot 10" wide and 3/4" thick and it has sagged 1/8 inch. Is plain timber a lot more expensive than timber that has been shredded into sawdust and glued back together again?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Use real timber. I have some here the same length you require (2cm thick) that are suspended at three points and completely full of A4 books and paper. No sag. I'd also think about screwing a 5-10cm lip at the back to give it rigidity. Also think very carefully about how the shelf bearers are fixed.
--
John Cartmell john@ followed by finnybank.com 0845 006 8822
Qercus magazine FAX +44 (0)8700-519-527 www.finnybank.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John Cartmell wrote:

Yes, this is what we have too - all 4 walls of this room are completely covered in shelves made of 3/4" softwood, with 50cm bracket spacing. No measurable sag despite vast quantities of books.
--
Grunff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It would be a good idea to put a strip of wood all along the back wall in addition. This will help to stop sag. Books are heavy.
Rob Graham
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John wrote:

not completely sure I've understood your problem - do you mean along the wall or outwards from the wall?
2 ways to handle the 8ft distance:
1. plug the wall at the extremities - one end at the exact location for that shelf, the other end apporximately positioned -- and screw in 2 x long screws. Stretch a building line between them and try the line with a spirit level, adjusting the line support until it is level. If you are unsure of your spirit level check by reversing it. Draw a horizontal line along the wall.
2. Drop a plumb line down the line of the support at one extremity. Mark in the vertical. Now mark off a 3-4-5 triangle from the vertical, draw and extend a horizontal line. Check by repeating from the other end if any doubt.
HTH
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John wrote:

Use blockboard instead of chipboard or MDF. Plywood isn't too bad, but blockboard has a better stiffness / money ratio. Books are _heavy_. Chipboard and MDF are no use at all.
Take a look at the Sagulator too (web search it)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Almost all appeals for help concern the "best way" to do something within given parameters. You might want to reconsider thread titles in your future posts to usenet.
John wrote:

It is the plumb lines you need to watch. A little out of level won't be too bad. You might choose to follow the ceiling and use a measure down from there for example. But 1 mm out with the uprights and they will always catch your eye.
If you haven't got a decent, longish level, use a plumb line to mark out where the uprights are going to be set every 26 to 23 inches or so -if you put the outer bearers some 6 to 8 inches in from the ends.
You can make a plumb line with some string and a ring spanner or some such weight. Exactly how are they fixing to the wall?
Your levels can be drawn in, using something with a square edge. Alternatively you could use geometry. More accurate but time consuming.
Put your first shelf up and all the others will go to a measured distance.
Any sagging in the future can be rectified by putting a piece of architrave or some other moulding on the front edge. Pin it and use some sort of suitable adhesive, grip-fill maybe.
Another alternative is to put some 2 x 2s under the shelves. Pinned to the uprights maybe? Remeber to allow enough space to get the books out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.