Best thing to cut plyboard (wardrobe backing)


I'm guessing an electric jigsaw is a bit too severe ?
I want to cut a hole so I can stick the wardrobe against the wall but have a cut out for the exisitng elec socket...
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You could use a jigsaw or a spiral saw (RotoZip).
Or drill four holes and use a pad saw:
http://www.toolstation.com/search.html?searchstr=pad+saw
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paulfoel wrote:

> I want to cut a hole so I can stick the wardrobe against the wall but > have a cut out for the exisitng elec socket...
Should be ok, if you stick a fine ish toothed blade in.
--
Cheers,

John.

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Hmm. I assume you know the sort of board I mean. The thin bendy stuff that you panel pin on to flat pack wardrobes (usually about 2mm thick).
Unfortunately, the wardrobes are already in place...
I'm just a bit concerned that a jigsaw will start to rip holes rather than a nice straight cut...
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paulfoel wrote:

A *variable speed* jigsaw with a very high tpi blade *should* be easy enough to control and avoid that.
For real precision, you can mark it out and then use a very small drill bit to pierce dozens of tiny holes along the line. The saw, on a very slow speed, should follow the holes very closely. It may be better to use a pad saw, or even a craft knife, to "join the dots" - epending on the circumstances.
-- Sue
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paulfoel wrote:

Shiny one side, fine waffle pattern the other? Typical hardboard basically.

As long as you can get the sole plate against the board, and are not trying to cut it while flapping about, you should be ok. If your jigsaw has a variable speed then slow it down a bit from its maximum, and use a fine sharp blade.
If you don't trust yourself to get neat edges, then mark the square out, and score the edges with a sharp knife. Then drill a hole in the middle and use the jigsaw to cut from the hole diagonally out to each corner. You can then snap off the waste bits at your score line.
--
Cheers,

John.

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A Stanley knife should do the job.
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wrote:

Hmm. I assume you know the sort of board I mean. The thin bendy stuff that you panel pin on to flat pack wardrobes (usually about 2mm thick).
Unfortunately, the wardrobes are already in place...
I am a little confused as in your first post you said "I want to cut a hole so I can stick the wardrobe against the wall but have a cut out for the exisitng elec socket..." now the wardrobes are in place!
Anyhow...
Do you know exactky where the sockets are, rather than 'they are somewhere about there!'. If so do some careful measuring and then lie on your tummy and using a metal straight edge and a Stanley knife make the cutout using several strokes along your lines rather than trying to 'saw it through'. Remember to allow for the strain relief part of the plug top (where the cable goes in) as depending how far back the socket is you may not be able to get the plug into the socket without the cable fouling on the backboard. I have done this before a few times successfully.
Other than that can the wardrobes be moved and then put back after the cutout has been done?
HTH
John
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I had to cut some of this board recently and I got a perfect cut by using a stanley knife. Once you have scored where the cut should be just keep genetly going over the scored line and you're through in no time. The blade isn't much use afterwards though!
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I will second that!! Stanley Blade.
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I will third it that ! stanley blade, had to do the same myself.
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reg wrote:

But first you each had to find your lost Stanley knives?
--
Rod

Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
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Try a 1/4" router and a trammel bar. Prefect circle every time.
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Used a stanley knife last night. Worked a treat.
Just marked it all out and scored over the line with the knife. 3/4 goes over it and a nice clean cut. Excellent.
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wrote:

But where would you get a round electric socket in the UK ;-)
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On Thu, 01 May 2008 12:58:26 GMT, "Harry Stottle"

Loads of people do them - intended to fit BESA conduit boxes.
--
Frank Erskine

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