Working on a contract

I am working on a contract and was wondering how to work in the added liability insurance cost. I usually have a smaller policy for smaller jobs, and the new possible job will account for a premium rise. I was trying to figure out a way to word this increase correctly into the contract. The owner wants to do a Time and Material Contract. jloomis
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John, If you have a line item in your contracts for insurance, (builders risk, general liability and/or bonds) add a clause that states that any direct increase in these costs during the duration of the contract SHALL be borne by the by the owner, with no additional markupof profit by the contractor. Typically, we as construction managers on fairly large projects, require specific bonding and insurance coverages, but also pay for that coverage. A good example would be a significant change order that raises the total contract value, the bond value also must increase to reflect the same percentage of the original contract value, that cost is legitimate and is the owner's responsibility. BTW, insurance and bonding costs are always paid in the first invioce along with mobilization costs. The contractor may not have performed any actual work on the project, but he has paid for the insurance, bonding and mobilization ( could be just a trailer or moving several pieces of equipment to the site).
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Thank You for that explanation. It helps me a lot when writing up a contract. I will discuss this with my attorney and see how we fit this into the contract. I did not want to take on the burden of excess insurance, and especially out of pocket. jloomis
"Tom Cular" wrote in message

John, If you have a line item in your contracts for insurance, (builders risk, general liability and/or bonds) add a clause that states that any direct increase in these costs during the duration of the contract SHALL be borne by the by the owner, with no additional markupof profit by the contractor. Typically, we as construction managers on fairly large projects, require specific bonding and insurance coverages, but also pay for that coverage. A good example would be a significant change order that raises the total contract value, the bond value also must increase to reflect the same percentage of the original contract value, that cost is legitimate and is the owner's responsibility. BTW, insurance and bonding costs are always paid in the first invioce along with mobilization costs. The contractor may not have performed any actual work on the project, but he has paid for the insurance, bonding and mobilization ( could be just a trailer or moving several pieces of equipment to the site).
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John , I hope the info was helpful, I realize the projects we work on are very different, but some of the same rules apply.
BTW, how did you make out with the tanks?

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Hello Tom, I actually did great with the tanks. I have them side by side, and one is enclosed in my maintenance generator shed/water treatment area. The new tank, I installed next to the outbuilding on a concrete slab. The water levels will work out fine so both tanks will fill equally, and I can then draw off of either or both. I am installing a 2" line at the base of the established tank, and connecting the new tank via the bottom. I have two valves that can shut off either or. Both tanks are covered by a roof/enclosed(I do not like sunlight on the tanks) and the new one shares the wood storage shed. Now I have to determine the drop in elevation to my new cleared area, so I can take advantage of gravity feed and pressure. I have a laser transit, and a David White sight level. Somehow, I have to figure out and easy way to find height difference. I was thinking about using a GPS? John
"Tom Cular" wrote in message

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On Sat, 31 Mar 2012 08:50:24 -0700, jloomis wrote:

Sheesh. Try two sticks and a line with a level on it. One stick at the high point, securing the string to the stick about a foot about ground. Set your other stick where you need it. Run the string to the second stick and secure it. Make the line level. Measure from the ground to the line.
If the drop is a few hundred feet, just use a long long stick.
Which is basically how it's done with the laser, but without the laser.
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Snipped ; What Rich is saying is correct, however with a couple hundred foot drop you would need a damn long stick! Use the laser level or the DW level and follow the principals for differential leveling (easily found on Google). Another approach would be to run a garden hose from the tank to the discharge point and measure the static pressure at the lower end with no flow, (a closed line). One foot of head equals 0.433 PSI. If you need more pressure or flow, install a pump near the lower end of the system. Let gravity help with the suction pressure of the pump. Pumps like to push , not suck. Single stage pumps, (inexpensive well pumps) will give you more than enough pressure and volume for garden irrigation.

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