Why won't builders build what people want?

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What we learned it that it is widespread at least in Minnesota. Very few of our soils are qualified to have a basement according to the soil scientists. Almost all older homes are build with basements anyway since no soil test is required for a basement to be built. Sump pums and dry wells are routine.
A basement is desireable for a house in a cold climate for obvious reasons. A basement can be built anywhere and waterproofing has improved a lot. That does not mean that a soil scientist will agree or approve. There are few dry basements in Minnesota in older houses and I suspect newer houses will leak given enough time.
I will agree that a specialist in soils is likely to have a rather conservative view when asked to put his reputation on the line. That does not make their opinions less valid just conservative.
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Okay..do you comprehend what "a few areas" means?
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Builders need to make money too. In the lower end 2-story-and-slap subdivisions, they have to cut corners to make money. Basement and large lots are the first things to go, followed by cheap materials and sloppy work. :-)
What people want is one thing. What they can afford is another.
For people who can afford it, yes, there are subdivisions with large lot, basement, and one-story.
JohnV@nn wrote:

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Chi' Minh Jr. wrote:

I've built quite a few buildings in Indianapolis and they won't leak when built and waterproofed properly such as the 30' square tunnel that runs under lilly's corporate center, dry as a bone building 47 is totally underground with 8' of dirt on top with trees planted on top of a 10" concrete lid
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Yes, I know, our thoughts too a few years ago. After talking to other people in the market they agreed with us, we wanted to see more single levels with basements. Evidently a lot of people thought that way, that is all they are building in our area now. The last builder expo/open house had 12 of 16 being ranches with basements!
Tim.
JohnV@nn wrote:

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"JohnV@nn" wrote in message

Quit looking at tract homes, and find a custom home builder. Even a tract home, you can get upgrades on.
If you can't afford to build a custom home, you have no one to blame, except yourself.
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wrote in message

People used to speak of it as Cadillac tastes with a Chevy budget.
Note: AKA champagne tastes and a beer budget, but premium beer costs as much as some champagne these days :~(
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Basements require proper techniques to keep them dry and many builders won't go to those lengths and/or don't have skilled crews to do the work. If you look at older homes, it seems some got the basement right and some didn't. A common complaint in new homes now is water in the basement. There are many products that seem designed to keep it out temporarily, but long term, it comes down to a building co's skill and attention to detail.
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I had a realestate agent come to look over my property, not for immediate sale, but because I wanted to make sure the changes I make don't divert too radically from the marketplace. The problem with the industry is that everything is reduced to a "national market" where everyone is presummed to have the same tastes and preferences. All buyer personalities are reduced to a uniform corporate mold. Also, the realestate computer listing system seems to favor new homes and recently developed neighborhoods. The search criteria is really crude, and so property values favor the newer over the old, it seems to me. The realestate agent doesn't seem to have professional skills in terms of matching buyers with sellers, really, it seems from my observation. Builders do their best to reduce costs, which means a slab foundation, 2 story building, on a tiny lot. I agree with you though, none of these things are what I want in my house. I like a raised foundation, single story, and large lot. In the long run, I'm pretty sure my tastes will better the average marketplace profit, as we have purchased a large lot on the waterfront with deep water access, and a single story ranch style house, which I'm currently fixing up. One thing is for sure though, now is NOT the time to sell.
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