Why do manufacturers make ridiculous claims?

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Its doubtful that piece of plastic will support 97,000 pounds, regardless of what's supporting the plastic.

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I find it complicated. It's not exactly the plastic providing the support but the plastic is containing a granulate that is taking the support. (The hex structure is famously strong, even used in XB-70 wings).
Perhaps we should calculate the bursting strength of one of the hexagon cells. Using 700#/sq.in, which is approximately the load bearing of soft wood. When struck with a hammer gets dented, iow's the hammer blow exceeds the compression strength of the wood. If I were to take a hexagonal shaped thingy into one of the hexs filled with sand, and struck it equally hard would the plastic hex burst? If that's a fair test, off hand, I think it will survive. IMHO, I think the spec is ok. (Where's good ole Bob Morrison when we need him?) Ken

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With gravel on the bottom, inside the hex spaces and on top, how much load do you think the plastic forms are actually carrying?
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Is this the part where I answer a silly question with a silly answer?
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it's the weakest link principle
don't pay me no mind, Im just agreeing with you
Tony
why he keep asking about the damn gravel now if his HEAD was in the plastic, yeah, maybe 100G
just kidding!
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A lot of words that don't say very much, and what they do say is misleading.
Obviously the product is intended for creating a drivable green surface. Thanks for clarifying that - the name grassy paver had confused me.
"It is assumed that the underlying soils..." That's your idea of engineering? ASSuming bearing capacity and soil conditions?
An 18 wheeler typically weighs in at around 80,000 pounds maximum load (federally mandated maximum). An average semi tire has approximately 60 square inches of contact area - that's ~7.5 SF of tire contact area per truck, or roughly 10,000 PSF.
If that grassy paver stuff has a rating of TEN times the maximum load allowed on federal highway - with the graded, layered and compacted base - why the nifong do they use asphalt and concrete for roads?
Your grasp of the numbers is as faulty as the manufacturer's claims. Move on - please. This is getting embarrassing.
R
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Interesting, having drove many interstate miles you get to notice the right hand lane has more tire dents. I suppose the surface temp in a hot sun could hit 120F, certainly can't walk on it in bare feet, so maybe more. Maybe that creates viscosity issues.

It costs to nifong much.

Anybody gotta a nifong industrial sized press? Ken
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Did you notice the load claims at "high" and low temperatures? The high temperature was 75 degrees. Where's that supposed to be and what's it supposed to represent? HDPE softens considerably with temperature. They don't attempt to make any disclaimers about climate. What do you think would be a normal high temperature for a paving product? I'd guess about 20 degrees higher than 75.

It'd cost a fraction of a real road and would shut all the greenies up. Someone would have suggested it and there'd be test roads under construction.
I don't doubt there are plenty of locations and applications for their stuff. It's just the ridiculous claims that are nifonged.
R
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RIco-
I visited the website & emailed the guy (he posted below) about the claims being made.
He sent me a link to some info from the mfr (he jut sells them)
looks like the mfr had some tests done on the plastic unit (filled & un-filled) AND the mfr (or their agent) did some hand waving based on the ASSTHO H-20 loading
And then extrapolated the results to some of insane psf number
the guy who signed the test report is some sort of clueless Phd.......reporting numbers with 6 or 7 "significant" figures, reporting psf's that no soil in the world could possibly support
Using the ASSTHIO loading & then extroplating to a generalized psf is like calc'ing the stress under a woman's high heel & extrapolating to a psf for floor loading!
Example:
120 pounds, assume .375" diameter heel tip, standing equally on both shoes,
540 psi translatesto >>>>>> 78,200 psf
makes as much sense as their test report & product claims
What they really have is a product that can take a higher "point load" (actually a local small patch distributed load) than normal (unconfined / un-reinfornced) soil.
With the plastic grid & grass roots, you wind up with a reinforced soil that (IMO) is at best is a few times stronger (locally) than regular soil MAYBE 20 or 30 psi
but it ain't asphalt or concrete!
cheers Bob
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wrote:

hehheh You obviously don't wear heels. You forgot to account for the sizable percentage of weight on the balls of the feet. Why do I suddenly feel like Reese Witherspoon in Legally Blonde?....................Bend....and Snap!
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I was considering the load case when "she's" rocking on her heels. :)
I didn't consider the dynamic effect of foot fall "impact" while walking
I think i also may have over estimated the heel tip diameter (I'm wearing flats today & didn't measure or reseach tip dia)
in any case I'm sure you get my example........heel tips are hard even oak floors so my number of ~540 psi is in the ball park
cheers Bob
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wrote:

<channeling Reeses again>Like I said, you obviously don't wear heels. Go get a pair, strap them on and try that stunt. (Make sure their not anybody's 'good ones'.)

Yes, probably the right order of magnitude. I'm just teasing you because you can work a calculator but not a pair of Jimmy Choos ; ) http://www.jimmychoo.com/pws/ProductDetails.ice?ProductID9893
--


MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.ca
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MB-
You have no idea what's in my closet.... :)
cheers Bob
I knew you were kidding me.
& I just pulled the example out of the air..... I divided the weight bu two but I also chose 120lbs (wishful thinking?) ...could have been 150+ :)
I refuse to go measure the heel tips...even too geeky for me.
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Well done, Bob! Let's see if they revise their claim to a number a couple of orders of magnitude more realistic.
R
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The roughly 180,000 lbs of a Boeing 747 is dispersed over 26 (?) tires of which about four or five sq ft (each)come into contact with the ramp/runway/taxiway.
Maybe they're promoting their stuff to firms building major airport runways?
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