Why a Heating and Air Vent in this location?

For those of you that build or design homes I have a question. Why do you, or would you, locate a Heating and Air vent to supply air to a water closet? I mean you have a room with just a toilet in it and hopefully an exhaust fan, which I can see the need for, but then many place a Heating and Air vent right there in the same room, near the exhaust fan. I mean, naturally, the heating and air vents feed air into the room to be circulated back to the Heating and Air return thereby pulling whatever other air exist inside the water closet, sometimes not the most desirable air mind you, back into the other parts of the house where you wouldn't necessarily want that, less than desirable, air?
Is there some code or practice I'm not thinking of or is this just something someone hasn't really thought about? If there is no code to the contrary my choice is never to place an air source that will be sucked back to the return in a room for the purpose of a water closet. Same principal almost when you put a vent into a half bath that is located right off the kitchen and usually has no outside wall. Why the need for a Heating and Air vent there as that room is going to assume the temperature of the area around it which is already heated and cooled and thereby you eliminate the possibly that you will suck distasteful odors from the half bath through the kitchen on their way to the Central Heat and Air return.
Maybe it's much ado about nothing but I'm just curious about it.
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Those of us who grew up sitting on a cold seat at the end of a path WANT hvac in the toilet. I can't remember ever seeing a inside toilet that didn't have heat in it.

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Thanks for the quick answer Glenn but if the water closet or half bath is on the inside of the home, no adjacent outside walls (I could see if it had an outside wall, getting cooler, would the seat still get cold and the ambient air around this area is all the same isn't it?
On 12/23/06 3:53 PM, in article 458d9742$0$5233$ snipped-for-privacy@roadrunner.com,

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Gary KW4Z wrote:

If the floor below and ceiling above are heated, then a completely interior bath room probably would not need HVAC, however, this isn't often the case. And as for your earlier concern about smell, this is usually not an issue as the volume of the house is so large as to dilute the bath room air pretty thoroughly. And if the exhaust fan is operating correctly, their won't be that much nasty air to circulate. Keep in mind that most forced air HVAC systems only operate for a relatively short period of time per hour whereas the vent should be operating continuously while the bathroom is occupied.
Matt
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Gary KW4Z wrote:

Don't you like fresh(er) air in there?
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I would hope so but with a powerful enough exhaust fan that'll be no problem changing the air in the room.
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One of the three bathrooms I have does not have a feed from the AC. It has a mold problem. It does have an exhaust vent. Something to consider.
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