Whence the term "California Roof" or "California Rake"?

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Someone posted links to houses that had "California roofs", but I wasn't able to distinguish what makes them have the name. And now, calling them Eichler roofs is not clearing them up any further.
If the top is a foot wider than the bottom, what does that mean? http://www.eichlernetwork.com/HDroofing1.html
http://tinyurl.com/yj9b26
( http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=%22eichler%20roof%22&btnG=Google+Search&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wi )
The description and appearance (aside from the center roofline in the image) really appear to fit the nature of the prairie house archetecture, with its deep eaves. In winter, the low sun provides a lot of heat and light to the interior, while in the summer, when the sun is high, the direct heating and lighting is minimized. Images here don't link to informative pages, but they show solar paneling being installed on a flat roof.
http://tinyurl.com/y7znuy
http://images.google.com/images?svnum &hl=en&lr=&q=%22prairie+style%22
Clicking on one of the images (a drawing, actually) brought up this description: (Most of the images are of at least 2-story houses, but I grew up understanding that the basic "ranch-style" suburban house was based on the prairie school of architecture. Of course I have probably confused two entirely separate theories.)
"Houses of the Prairie style are characterized by an overall horizontal emphasis achieved by low proportions, low-pitched or flat roofs with wide overhangs, banded casement windows, and low, massive chimneys. Prairie houses are irregular in plan, two stories high, with one-story wings. Siding is brick or stucco with stone or wood trim.
The Prairie style was developed in Chicago by architect Frank Lloyd Wright around the turn of the century. Wright disapproved of styles that were revivals of earlier styles and designed buildings with horizontal emphasis and an open simplicity that would relate to the flat, open landscape of the Middle West. The Prairie style is most common in Chicago, other parts of Illinois, and in surrounding states."
(The small descriptions of the Eichler boom seem to locate them in the SF Bay area.)
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Pat Darken wrote: Someone posted links to houses that had "California roofs", but I wasn't able to distinguish what makes them have the name. And now, calling them Eichler roofs is not clearing them up any further.
It is harder than I thought to find a good picture.
This is not what I think of as a classic Eichler roof, which is one large wing rising at a low pitch, or has two asymmetrical wings. Apparently Eichler, like Picasso, went through periods. But it does match a drawing that the original poster made.
www.actionproperties.com/ads/trophy952.html (link is presumably time limited)
-- --------------------------------------------- Richard Maurer To reply, remove half Sunnyvale, California of a homonym of a synonym for also. ----------------------------------------------------------------------
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low-pitched roof in contrast, and at a lower level. In both examples, the more steeply pitched roof has been in the center, but I can appreciate having it to one side, and even (correct me if I am wrong) having the steeply pitched roof with a single slope (not a gable, but a single pitch, like a leanto as opposed to a tent) and a contrasting low-pitched section, or two.)
Thanks.
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