whats best water pump for homemade suds-saver from laundry tub

I used to have a washing machine that could save the warm soapy water from one washing cycle and re-use it for the next cycle. Now I don't have that machine any more, I wonder if I can hook up a water pump and a switch: to pump all the warm soapy water out of one of the double laundry sinks & back into the washing machine. What kind of pump can I use. It doesn't have to be a sump pump, it need not have a switch; because I can hook up hose and an electrical on/off control switch to otherwise permanently on wiring/switch. I could even get a motor from something like a power drill (or a garage sale drill), and mount it all under the sink, where there is lots of room generally. I am not sure how long it would take, i.e. what kind of g.p.m. of the pump should be, the faster the better. Any suggestions where to get the component of such a water pump? I would prefer to really keep the cost down.
I only know rec.woodworking and this group, which I treat as building &/or constructing, and know of no other place to put is type of Q at the moment.
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Way OT, but...
You'd have to substantially modify the washer (so it has two water inputs, one for wash/rinse, one for recycled wash water (when available). You'd need a pump, and some form of storage tank (lot's of poly tanks fit the bill here). Since the washer would need to know if there was recycled water available for a wash cycle, you'd need some form of intelligence there. Then you need some way to prevent a double reuse fo wash water (or are you going to reuse forever? <g>)
In the end, you will need a controller (I frequently deal with industrial process controllers--very similar applications) which will nto be easy to make or cheap to buy... The the associated plumbing, pumps, tanks, etc, to boot.
End result will be that it will cost *much* more than using fresh water and soap, both in basic costs and operating costs. Add to that the idea that that second batch of cloths proably won't be clean enough makes me wonder if this type of project makes any sense at all? but if you must, start by looking (eBay?) for a used industrial process controller system. It would need a few inputs and a few outputs (say perhaps 4 inputs, and 4 outputs, but maybe more.) Oh, and relays, and associated circuitry too...
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One, it would be a mickey mouse setup.
Two, even if you did hook it up it would take two lifetimes to break even with the cost versus the saving not to mention you are using dirty water.

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1) I am really sick of seeing 6 wet buckets over a grate on the second tub 2) I am really sick of seeing 6 wet buckets over a grate on the second tub 3) I have actually built/constructing something of a entirely finished basement
The first thing thing that comes to mind is the power-hand-drill powered pump you attach clear plastic hose to, but in order to get rid of the buckets, the speed probably has to be increased beyond that flow. It is a better system, but if its still too slow, the buckets will stay, which is bad. So you see the problem.
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I could get a used pool pump for $50. 1-1/2" hose faster than a garden hose. take about 5 seconds to empty the tub. I actually used one once to pump out a backyard; one usually circulating 100 000L of water. I had to put thick sheets of steel down in order not to dig a hole to China. rip your arm right off! it put a pronounced crease in heavy gage steel from the suction. Maybe one from an above ground pool?
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