Water Heater Thermostat settings ?

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In typed:

120 to 140 degrees, best I can tell. I chose 130 degrees F, deciding to split the difference, and have never had any problems. But I didn't get the information here: I got it from a few reliable sources, all of whom provided the same temperatures, even the local code enforcement office.
Whenever I see a long list of people crawling out of the woodwork with responses as happened in this thread (and often happens), I seldom bother to read them as the summation of the advice is going to be 1. unverifiable, 2. misleading and 3. based on guesses and "feelings". You seldom ever see anyone give any kind of verifiable information sources.
HTH,
Twayne
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So, Twayne, you split the difference between the lower and upper elements ? From that strategy, do you get pretty even water temperature throughout its 50 gallon capacity ??
Thanks !!
James
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120 to 140 degrees, best I can tell. I chose 130 degrees F, deciding to split the difference, and have never had any problems. But I didn't get the information here: I got it from a few reliable sources, all of whom provided the same temperatures, even the local code enforcement office.
Twayne
--------------------------------- Please remember, the only question from this OP was whether the top thermostat should be set at same temp as the lower one. Out of 34 messages so far, I think one person has addressed this single question posed in the OP. Most other messages have tried to tell me **what temperature** I should set my water heater. As I noted in my OP, I have already decided that.
Thanks !!
James
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James wrote:

Hi, A few times installing new tank or thermostat. I noticed most of them came with temp. set at 140. I have a few tanks at my stores and cabin. They are all set at 135 or 140.
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In typed:

Either I mis-spoke or you mis-read: I set the TEMP to 130 period; I did not mean to say one element was set different than the other; sorry if I gave that impression. In this case they were both set to the same temp; 130 degrees. Still too hot for my liking, but hot enough for the dishwasher and I've changed shower faucets to the temperature-control kinds. But electricity got too expensive and we switched to an oil fired water heater and saved a bundle on electricity. Up to now, anyway; not so sure it's a savings anymore with prices so high but it recovers very quickly.
HTH,
Twayne

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typed:

In Greece, especially Iraklion, Crete, we have (mostly) electric water heaters with always one element. We have solar water heaters (not in rental houses), so we have plenty of hot water 330 days a year, free (if you count out the ~1000 euros initial expense for the solar heater) These solars come with a 4kW (auxilliary) element, that has a 1 1/2" thread (IIRC) and either a 35 or 38 mm nut. I always set the thermostat at 60 degrees celsius, which is a good compromise for having enough hot weater and electricity waste. They also have a connecting option to the furnace, so you have 3 ways to heat water (solar, furnace, electric). The classic electric boilers have also one element, usually 4 or 3 or sometimes 2 kW, and I always set the thermostat at 60 C. I also change any bad elements myself ( it goes without saying that you must drain the heater of water before removing the bad element).
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Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
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wrote:

I used to keep my water pretty hot, at least 140 because of the dishwasher recommendations, sometimes more. My water heaters had a tendency to fill with gunk and then the bottom element would burn out. I bought a dishwasher with a water heat feature and turn the water heater down to about 120 and most of the gunk problem went away. So my recommendation for your new heater is set it as low as you can get away with considering legionnaires and dishwasher issues.
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There is a lot of miss info in this thread about legionella.
It's mainly a problem for water that is _stored_ at below 60C.
So you can use a wax cart mixer to mix hot water fom the tank at say 65C with cold water to produce a safe 44C.
I don't know that specific water heater you have but the sealed type that use a heat exchanger can be run at less than 60C because they can be dosed with chemicals.
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