Washing Machine Vibration Problem

In a new custom-built home, the 3,000 sq ft ground floor is supported by an 8-course block foundation and TJI's over a crawl space. The laundry room and clothes washer is located in an area resting on an 18' TJI span supported on the foundation at each end.
On the clothes washer's slowest spin cycle, vibration radiates out to 15' enough to loosen drywall screws and cause moldings to separate at seams.
To damp the vibration, we braced one of the two TJI's right under the washer with a 4x4. There is some improvement but not enough. We are looking for more ideas as to what can be done.
Should we try installing additional bracing under the TJI's in the location of the washer: more 4x4's, several permanent jacks, concrete block columns, etc.?
An additional possibility is to install vibration-absorbing pads. One product aimed at the retail market can be seen at http://www.kellettent.com/ (very slow loading website): the "LP-13 Shake Absorber® Vibration & Isolation Pad" described at http://www.kellettent.com/mountingpads.html .
The IQS Directory lists many suppliers of vibration absorbers, but they seem to be mostly industrial: http://www.iqsdirectory.com/pagetwoads.aspx?CatID 7.
We would be grateful for any thoughts, ideas, suggestions.
Thanks in advance.
Al B.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Al B" wrote...

It does all that damage and the washing machine doesn't dance across the floor?

For some reason, I don't think it's a structural problem. Sounds more like the washing machine is out of balance. Check the level on the machine, try running an empty load with just water. It could be that who ever is doing laundry is overloading it or not distributing the clothes evenly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
hawgeye wrote:

It also could be that it's a new machine. They often have shipping straps that need to be cut or screws that need to be removed so the drum can move around. Maybe that step got missed...
--
Art

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Art, thanks for the response. In reply to hawgeye, I just posted additional information about the washer, the installation, the service call, and the way we use the washer. If you have any more ideas, we would love to hear them. Thanks again.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hawgeye, thank you for replying. Here is some additional information.
Additional information: The washer is a Whirlpool Gold Catalyst Three-Speed Electronic Washer Model No. GSX9885JQ1, Serial No. CP4602130 installed in April 2003. The vibration problem was obvious immediately and the dealer returned to check the installation and the leveling. He said it was installed and levelled properly. Then we had a Whirlpool service call and the technician said the machine was operating properly.
We have run water only, loads of all types at all water levels, over 31 months and we have the problems with every load every time.
On Sun, 17 Dec 2006 17:39:03 -0600, "hawgeye"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have installed commercial tumbler washers and they have to be fastened to a 8" channel iron frame that is sitting on 4" steel posts whose bottoms extend into the basement and have yards of concrete poured around them. The holes in the floor are made large enough so the posts don't touch any part of the floor because they would shake the whole building apart.
It would be a lot of work but you could use this method with your washer. Build a 2" angle iron frame supported by 4 steel posts. Build a form in the crawl space about 4 feet square and 2 feet high around the posts. Temporarily remove the floor inside the posts Pour the form full of concrete through the hole in the floor and make sure the posts don't touch the floor. You will need the form built correctly or it will split apart from the weight of the concrete. The floor will never move again.
--
JerryD(upstateNY)

> Hawgeye, thank you for replying. Here is some additional information.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Years ago, too many to remember I saw an article in Popular Mechanics about some kind of base for a washing machine. Basically it was two plywood lids, (board with lip around all four corners) that opposed each other with springs about 4" in diameter at the four corners. The whole base was between 6 to 8" tall. It was used next to a base for the dryer, that had a drawer, and was the same height. This would 'absorb' a lot of the washer's thrashing. my2cents.
--
please reply to bargerw NO @ SPAM bellsouth.net and remove the NOSPAM


"Al B" < snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
don't fix it.... use it to have sex on it... buy a regular washer for clothes
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Al B wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't know whether your still looking for answer or not. Actually the answer is quite simple. All washers need to be 'leveled' when installed. There are four adjustable legs under the washer that need to be screwed in or out to level the machine (so that it doesn't rock from side-to-side or front-to-back).
First determine which way the washer is out of balance and then screw down the leg on the "high" side. (Washers need to be leveled to prevent vibrations when the load is off-center, but it's NOT at all important as to whether they are bubble level front-to-back or side-to-side (so don't worry about that aspect). Just need to get it all four legs positioned to take equal portions of the weight.
Dennis

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think most washers today use self-levelling legs. You need to rock the machine back and forth a bit to get the legs to support equally, but no screw adjustments are needed.
-- Dennis: not the same Dennis :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I didn't know that (which gives you an idea how old our Maytag's are)! Thanks Dennis (not the same Dennis) <g>

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.