Vibrating pavers after rain?


I am finishing my paver installation today, but I don't think I'll have time to vibrate them into place. It's supposed to rain over the next few days. Is it OK to wait for things to dry out and _then_ vibrate them, or do I really need to get this done today?
Also, any tips for vibrating pavers? I would like to avoid breakage. Should I lay down a piece of plywood between the pavers and the plate compactor, to help disperse the impact?
Thanks -Mark
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I would wait for the ground to dry completely ( but thats just me) As for the plywoold DO NOT vibrate without it. The results without plywood will likely be a disaster. You are dead on about the plywood

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Tony M wrote:

I've never heard of needing plywood for this. I'd ask the maker of the pavers, but you be fine running a vibrating compactor over the pavers directly.
Matt
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In my neck of the woods plywood is always used. It really has nothing to do with cracking the pavers but it makes it easier to vibrate them uniformly so you dont get any major dips from staying in one place too long.

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Tony M wrote:

That is a technique issue, not a plywood issue! You must carry around a lot of scrap plywood as it would take a lot of sheets for a decent sized driveway or patio. And moving one sheet around from spot to spot would take forever.
Matt
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That is a technique issue, not a plywood issue!
I've never heard of this technique, but if one is going to use plywood, the first thing that occurs to me is to use it the way cement finishers use it- two small, easy to handle pieces, and keep moving one in front of the other.
I've seen pavers vibrated, but I've never been involved in it and have no idea what good technique is.
Mark, best of luck, and let us know how it comes out!
--
Lyle B. Harwood, President
Phoenix Homes, Inc.
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If the pavers are real clay bricks then you should protect them. The concrete pavers are less brittle but don't look as good.
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Tony M wrote:

nothing to do

uniformly so

I've never seen plywood used, and I don't agree with your explanation. If someone can't operate a plate compactor - know when to hit the OFF switch - then maybe someone else should operate the machine.
The plywood is not necessary to prevent cracking, an unnecessary expense, and inefficient use of time. So what's the point?
R
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But for someone who's never done it before, and probably won't again for years, wouldn't the extra effort possibly pay off, and have little chance of negatively affecting the result?
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Sorry Rico but the plywood makes it much easier to get a quality job particularly when its a one shot deal. Learning "good technique" takes practice and a feel for the equipment. In this case its a rental and the OP is only going to do it once, maybe twice. Plywood will give him a much more professional job with far less dips and hills. It will add a small penalty time wise but thats about it. Ripping it all out because you did a crappy job would be even worse.
He doesnt plan on doing this for a living.

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Tony M wrote:

explanation.
OFF
takes
the OP

much more

penalty
crappy
A plate compactor is not a Formula I car. They're not that tough to operate. As you pointed out earlier, staying in one place too long is a mistake. That's why they tell you to keep it moving when it's on. I'm sure Mark will be able to figure out ON = MOVING.
You said in an earlier post "In my neck of the woods plywood is always used." You didn't mention that it was just for beginners, you said always. I'm always willing to learn so I did a quick Google and I couldn't find an instance where plywood was recommended. Everywhere from DIY sites to paver manufacturers recommended the industry standard - keep a thin layer of sand on the surface when using the compactor. You're insisting on an unnecessary step.
Mark's free to do what he wishes, as are you, I am just pointing out that your method is not standard.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

And not only is it non-standard, it may well cause harm. Not following the manufacturers recommendations is almost always a fool's game.
Matt
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It's become quite soggy around here, so I guess I'll have to wait for a dry spell to put the finishing touches on my paving.
None of the "how-to" guides that I have seen have mentioned putting anything between the pavers and the plate compactor. So I'm glad I thought to ask about it. Thanks for reinforcing the point!
-Mark
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Mark wrote:

And the reason is that there is no need to do that. I'm always amazed that people will believe a post on the net from someone they don't know, yet ignore multiple other sources of information.
Matt
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Wow. You make it sound like I'm about to send a large check to the ex-wife of a deceased Nigerian dictator.
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