Skriting

Situation is 3 bedroom home, recently built on concrete piers. Piers are square 12"X12" variety. Closest part of wooden sill to the ground is 18" in the rear of the house to over 3 feet in front of the house. Subfloor is insulated with fiberglas type insulation, and has fine nylon net throughout bottom. House has cement board siding similar to James Hardie's horizontal siding. Homebuilder did not install a skirt. I desire to the house to have a skirt around the bottom where the piers are exposed of course.
Have landscaped the soil to cause water runoff from roof and surrounding area to move away from the house. The natural slope of the land is from the back to the front of the house for watershed during rain periods. Typical rain is heavy at times, with longer dry periods. No water accumulation is anticipated around the house due to the grade of the land.
Yesterday was sunny, windy and warm (low in a.m was 62F, 85F for high). The house stayed less than 70F until around 5 p.m. when direct sunshine was below roofline. House slightly warmed until sunset. So, am satisfied with insulating properties of the house. The house faces south.
There are just few varmints to be concerned about in the area, other than the occasional domestic dog or cat. Namely armadillos, roadrunners, raccoons, possums, occasional white-tail deer, black vultures, and other birds. Except for the domestic-type animals, the remainder would be transients if they sought refuge under my house as they shy away from people. And wouldn't expect any to pry any type skirting to make entry.
Have rough idea how to apply the skirting, namely, use PT lumber for frame to the piers and bottom side of the sill (subfloor frame sits on sill), then apply the skirting material. But, this isn't specific enough. Any weblinks on exactly how to do this?
Brick, or cement, or any other material that practically seals, except for installed vents, the crawlspace, I am not consdering. Am considering plastic lattice, James Hardie's perforated soffit (water contact?), or any other ventilation conducive material. Don't want to spend alot of money. But, am interested in maximum ventilation, varmint entry restrictions. Any ideas?
BTW The sill perimeter is vertically parallel with the outside framed walls and subfloor framing perimeter. The sill perimeter is also vertically parallel with the concrete piers on outside of the house. The perimeter sills are doubled up 2X12 PT lumber. The walls are clad with OSB plywood, with cement, horizontal siding over that. The cement siding drapes 2" below the bottom of the sill perimeter bottom. Making this more interesting, and less straightforward. Maximum pier to pier OC is 8', to as little as 7' 3'.
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- Lil' Dave -

frame
sill), then

weblinks
- Nehmo - Mobile homes are routinely skirted. The material is usually vinyl, example:
http://www.mhrv.com/images/osk/deluxe.jpg [1], but there are other options. If you "Don't want to spend alot of money", use one of those systems. You won't need a wood frame.
You build to allow for a little movement of the ground, and the most common cause for damage is people kicking-in. Remember to make an access door if you don't use skirting that opens anywhere.
[1] You might want something that's more consistent with the appearances of your house.
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* Nehmo Sergheyev *
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On the new mobiles in the area, they lay down a layer of tamped gravel and place ground contact PTL 2X4s "flat" on it, pin them down to the ground and run 24" OC uprights. To that they add the Hardieboardskirt. Seems to work better than the old unsupported vinyl skirt, especially since you re going up to 3'
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