Share your accidents and close-calls so others can learn from them?

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A couple of weeks ago i was routing a curved piece of 3/4 MDF on the router table for a form. i was wearing goggles and told my son to leave the workshop until i was done. the edge caught the bit and i let go.... the bit grabbed along the entire length of the heavy piece, accelerating it and shooting it accros the room into a radiator cover i was working on. the impact was as loud as a shotgun, and knocked the radiator cover off the workbench with tremendous force. it was scary and a reminder of what can happen. i was able to fix the damage on the radiator cover, and will make sure my son is always out of harms way.....maybe my wife would like to hang out in the workshop next time ;)
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The problem I see with accidents and the young people around here, is they do not want to follow rules. Any rules!
The respect they get from their friends grows with the severity of the accidents they have. The worse the accident, the more "respect" they get from their "friends".
Their thinking is: Don't read any rules. Don't follow any rules. Do the opposite!
What they don't understand is that many rules/laws are in place to protect THEM. This is advice handed down from others who have had accidents or by a community which wants to prevent such accidents from occurring in the future.
I'm talking about safety rules in the front of instruction manuals, OSHA rules, driving laws/rules, building code rules, etc.
No one ever thinks about WHY rules/laws were created in the first place. Why it says to wear safety goggles. Why there is a speed limit. Why you should wear a safety harness when working high up. Etc.
Actually these rules/laws are a detailed history of accidents which have happened in the past. So when it says to wear eye protection, this is because someone has used that piece of equipment in the past and had an eye injury. Or the electrical code says to do your wiring in a certain manner - well someone died in the past or was electrocuted because the wiring was not done in this manner.
So these young people can start their lives by reading and following rules/laws. Or they can place their lives in the hands of Darwin... (In my area, Darwin has claimed the lives of 3 young people already this summer.) Needless...
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on 8/10/2007 11:11 AM Bill said the following:

All kids are immortal and immune to things that happen to other people.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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My son (just turned 16) received a painful reminder of his own mortality from a lawnmower at the end of June:
http://www.milmac.com/MangledShoe.jpg <WARNING: not for the faint of heart>
Fortunately, he wasn't badly hurt, and has almost completely recovered. His left big toe is about 1/4" shorter than it used to be; other than that, he's fine, and has been playing soccer again for a couple weeks now.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

I didn't look, thanks for the warning. It's good to hear he's OK! Lawnmowers can do ugly things.
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on 8/10/2007 2:28 PM B A R R Y said the following:

The pic is not that bad. No foot in the pic, just a sneaker and sock. My Golden Retriever, as a pup, did more damage to one of my shoes than that mower. :-)
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Best dogs ever. Will love you to death. Both sides of our family have had them from way before they were popular. Lots of great stories. But them razor puppy teeth......they're like a buck saw on anything they happen across...
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on 8/10/2007 5:11 PM Thomas G. Marshall said the following:

...and except for the hair. Sheds 24/7/365. Vacuum one day and have little tumbleweeds in the corners next day. We have a central vacuum and the app. 25 gallon can gets filled to the top with hair every couple of months. Enough to build another dog.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Read somwhere that a lady was knitting sweaters ought of dog hair, wouln't that be a hoot!
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bob wrote:

fur from their collie dogs for jumpers. As I own a Collie I can attest to fact that she sheds enough to make a three piece suit every year :)
A Scottish breakfast
1. Porridge 2. Glass of Scotch 3. Collie Dog
The dog eats the porridge
regards John
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A white sheppard puppy can do some dammage with teeth too, they razor sharp and curved, ours caught me right at the edge of my finger nail while I was feeding her something, it sank in and I jerked back, OUCH ripped out some meat there with it also, hurt for a month.
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

With a little luck, the wisdom he got from that will help him reach his 17th birthday (and many more).
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To be honest, I have seen more accidents in my 20+ years of commercial construction that were caused by careless "old timers" who were confident that they were in complete control. I have corrected safety issues with the younger guys on the site, but the seasoned vets believe they know more than I do and continue on doing it however they want.
Charlie
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"Charlie" <None> wrote in message
...[rip]...

I believe both sides. But this reminds me. For what it's worth, when I was becoming certified for scuba, the instructor pointed out that she was not the slightest bit worried about the inexperienced divers such as us at the time. It was always the experienced divers becoming overconfident, and especially the experienced divers who have not dived in a long time and jump right back into it, that too often get hurt. Or die.
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Thomas G. Marshall wrote:

My diving instructor had us all play underwater rugby the first night. The idea was for someone to get, hold, and deposit a 5 pound block of rubber in a bucket at one end of the pool. Other than that, there were no rules. Now 8 feet of water isn't very deep, until you're near the bottom - with the "ball" - almost out of air and four or five guys allegedly trying to take the "ball" away from you but actually trying to drowned your sorry ass to eliminate some competition. The macho guys were the first ones that had to be pulled from the pool and resucitated after pushing themselves WAY passed their limit (or being held under well passed their limit).
The lesson taught - when you're in or under the water - NEVER get even close to what you think is your limit. When your tank tells you it's time to surface - do it.
Other lessons taught
When a current grabs you go with it, fighting it will kill you. It WILL let you go after a while and the ride can be quite exilerating.
If you don't know for sure that it's edible, don't shoot it.
If you're not sure you can kill it - don't shoot it.
At or below 60 feet, if you see a liquid in your mask that ain't water clear but rather sort of green - DO NOT CLEAR YOUR MASK - that's blood - the water filters out red first. Head up and out and find out why your nose is bleeding.
Always dive with at least one partner - and keep him/her on the "blue water" side - cuts your chances of getting shark bit in half, even lower if you're on the shallow water side.
NEVER get out of the water with a loaded speargun.
DO NOT point a loaded spear gun at your instructor and show him how you bent your spear point on a rock with your last shot. ( I actually saw a student do that. He spent a two day trip sitting on board while the rest of us were out for grouper and lobsters) .
If you're dumb enough to shoot a Parrot Fish, don't show it to your diving instructor or brag about the BIG fish you got. Parrot Fish are the puppy dogs of the reef -and they put a lot of blood in the water if you poke a hole in them.
Unless you absolutely know what's in a hole - DO NOT STICK YOUR ARM IN IT.
If you aren't sure the opening in the other end is big enough for you to get through DO NOT SWIM INTO A CAVE / TUNNEL.
Back to woodworking
If that little voice in the back of your head is saying "DON"T DO IT!" - then don't do it, whatever "it" is.
An often overlooked danger - you've just milled up a board and it now has nice square corners and nice square edges. They WILL cut you if they have a chance to slide against your tissue. So if you grab that freshly milled Four Square board, make sure you've got a good grip on it - or have BandAids readily available.
DO NOT move cut offs away from a running bandsaw blade with any part of your body.
If something doesn't sound right - find out why.\\
When a chisel or anything else with a sharp cutting edge is falling off your bench DO NOT TRY AND CATCH IT.
If your jaw is clenched or your shoulders are tight your body is trying to tell you something. Find out what that is ASAP.
If you work alone in a detached building, or even a basement, keep a portable phone or cell phone on you. You may be the only one who can call 911 in time.
A full sheet of 3/4" MDF is heavy and slippery. If you're lifting it off a table or bench to get it vertical for carrying, and it slips, all that weight and all that momentum will usually land on one or both of your feet. Get help or cut it down to manageable pieces.
Nail guns, and even pin nailers may not drive the nail like you think they will. Shooting a nail - even a pin nail - into your finger and thumb is not a good idea. Keep fingers and thumbs well away from where the nail MIGHT go.
charlie b
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My diving instructor had us peel and eat a banana while under water.
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<nega-snip of quoted text>

I think the word you are looking for is "snip" ;-)
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I think the word you are looking for is "mega" ;)
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wrote in message

ooops!
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Snip

saying "It's jammed I think Sarg". Well I think he got the "Sarg" bit out just before the barrel was pushed to one side and a bunch of fives caught him on the chin. He sure learnt a lesson and the rest of us watching did to.
Sometimes Words just ain't enough :)
regards John
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