sand mound septic system too big, help

My mother has a lakeshore home on Lake Mille Lacs near the town of Isle, Minnesota. We are attempting to replace the twenty year old septic system (a septic tank and holding tank requiring periodic pumping) with some type of mound system. I have noticed several mound systems in our neighborhood (they all look alike to me).
Our lot is small and Mille Lacs county is telling us the typical sand mound system is a little too large to fit on the lot. They suggested looking into an alternative mound system that requires less room than the standard sand mound we were considering.
On the Internet I have encountered the terms "textile filter technology" describing a smaller mound system and also "aerobic treatment" describing another smaller system. I also heard about a "peat" mound system that I believe is also smaller than a sand mound system. If anyone has any experience with any of these septic systems, I would appreciate your analysis of them.
Also, if anyone has encountered a similar situation as ours, I am interested in the solution you found and the type of septic system you used.
Approximate costs (price range) of these alternative septic systems are also appreciated, if possible.
TIA, Terry
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Conventional septic system used a two stage septic tank, one tank if for solids and the 2nd is liquids, followed by a gravity fed leech field. The way I understand it, if you don't have adequate native soil drainage, you either need a holding tank, an aerobic system, or an above ground leech field. The above ground leech field is comprised of sandy soil and 1 inch gravel, or peat, or some other material that absorbs and evaporates the effluent. The effluent is pumped from an onboard pump in the septic tank with a float sensor that turns the pump on. The pump is in a 3rd stage tank of the septic tank. An aerobic system uses popup sprayers that spray at intervals the effluent in a designated area. Does not require as an extreme soil depth as a conventional system for leeching.
Least expensive is the conventional system. Followed by the aerobic system. Followed by the mound system. Prices vary in the area you live in, the septic tank capacity, difficulty excavating, material price for the mound soil, permits, bringing electrical power to the septic tank, and so forth. The availability of any type of septic system is dependent on the county/parish you live in, the soil and size of lot, and contractors who can do those septic system versions.
Call the local county agent for checking your native soil drainage, and septic system approved for your county. Call some septic contractors and be sure they come out and look at your lot and designated location of the septic tank and the leech field. When hired, they have to draw up a plan for your septic system and submit it to the county. The county may or may not approve it. Some septic contractors do not do electrical work. They temporarily connect electrical power to the 3rd stage pump to adjust the flow by way of a valve to the leech field, or aerobic sprayers. When set correctly, the county inspector will check this as a final inspection.
--
Jonny



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Have you considered how many times you could pump the existing tank for the money you will spend on a new system ? You would probably be WAY ahead to leave the system alone and just pump it when needed.

--
JerryD(upstateNY)



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If or when the property is sold, the buyer can have difficulty getting a mortgage if the septic is not functioning. Repairing the septic now will likely be cheaper than in the future.
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