Roofing

I am in a new home and I noticed that the shingles were placed across a valley where two roof sides intersected. It seems to me that there should be a strip of metal flashing down the length of the valley and the shingles should be flat against each plane of the roof. The way that it was done creates a curved shingles covering both planes and a fair size opening at the eave. I wonder if there is one right way to go about this...
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What you're describing is what I believe is called a "closed valley". I don't like the look of it most of the time, but if it's properly done, I'd wait until the roof need replacing before I did anything about it.
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MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.ca
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in these parts, that is called a woven valley, and many people feel it looks better than having flashing in the valley. using sheet metal in the valley is no more waterproof than a woven valley. It's a matter of preference. Just how new is your home? If the roof hasn't been through a summer's heat, the shingles will lay down in the heat.
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A woven shingled valley in my opinion is better. It is uninterrupted and therefore no seems. It would be my preference if I had one. depending on how large the opening is at the eave I'd say you have a better roof. Is the opening more than say a 1/2 an inch? It should shrink after a summer's worth of heat.
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