replace vinyl siding with stucco in flat roof building?

We own a 1948 constructed Art Moderne design, flat roofed, concrete walled home on Vancouver Island (wet winters, warm dry summers). The exterior of the home was clad in vinyl siding in 1989 because the previous owner was tired of repainting the old stucco every three years and because he wanted to add a 1" layer of polystyrene insulation to the exterior concrete walls. There is an Art-Deco detailing just below the roofline so the siding/insulation starts 1' below the roofline, creating a 2" capped lip where the insulation-siding starts and continues to ground level. This flashing "lip" is sealed against the concrete wall with caulking.
We are considering replacing the siding with stucco to return the home to its original look (flat white stuccoed walls with rounded corners into the window frames). However, we are very concerned about doing so in this wet winter climate with a flat roof and no over-hanging eaves as we foresee it as being a high maintenance option and see potential for :
1) lots of cleaning or repainting green mold at the end of each winter 2) potential for water damage in behind the lip where the new stucco would meet the concrete wall 3) staining at the splash level where the stucco would meet the sidewalks
We are not prepared to remove the insulation to have the stucco flush with the exterior concrete. We are beginning to think that as nice as it would be to return to a non-vinyl siding look that the maintenance nightmare would offset the benefits of a "nicer look".
Any ideas or suggestions appreciated!
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In a previous post Larry Gagnon wrote...

Instead of stucco you might look at some of the newer EIFS systems that use a synthetic stucco for the surface. Flashing detailing is important in these systems and installation by a qualified contractor is even more important. This is a common method of condo and apartment construction in Seattle.
--
Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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...and if the character of the building is a primary concern, hire an architect with a sympathy for the building and the style to detail the changes you need done. Your interventions should be sensitively done if it's as interesting a building as you make it sound.
--


MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.ca
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In a previous post Michael Bulatovich wrote...

Excellent points by Michael!
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Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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EIFS are going to give you more of the same -- synthetic or not -- EIFS are still permeable which can and will mold up just like any other material in an environment where excessive moisture can be or is present. EIFS bubble. Think bad sunburn that blisters and that's what happens to EIFS in an environment such as yours. One crack or pinhole is all it needs. Furthermore, look around the region. Do you still see EIFS being used as prominently as they once were? The answer is almost always no -- not hardly -- because EIFS requires significant skill in application and they continue to fail too frequently regardless. Warm dry climates yes. Moist wet climates no.
If you went with EIFS anyway the best course of action would the removal of all exterior material down to the surface of the concrete exterior walls. The EIFS gives all the insulation properties that could be needed and resolves your other detailing concerns. After many years in actually building rather than offering my opinion about stuff I've never actually done the most important part of any project is always always always the preparation. For EIFS you prepare by getting the cleanest and most evenly surfaced wall which the EIFS will be attached to directly.
I think I know how you feel about the aesthetics of your place but I would consider just buying an inexpensive power washer and use bleach in the water to spray the siding to keep it clean and bright looking. Bleach helps to kill bacteria which causes mold and a clean and bright siding can be okay aesthetically. Who knows?
Unless there are significant historic preservation concerns in the neighborhood and significant resell value which can pay off -- now -- at this point in time when economic systems are being disrupted to the point of failure I would suggest going with what you got, save the money which is better spent on building and keeping a happy family. Go to Disneyland. Take your family to Europe for a vacation and spend the rest of whatever you have available to prepare for the coming economic failures, food shortages, and other nightmares being planned and implemented with murder and mayhem being perpetrated by the globalist new world order facsists.
<%= Clinton Gallagher NET csgallagher AT metromilwaukee.com URL http://clintongallagher.metromilwaukee.com / MAP http://wikimapia.org/#yC038073&x=-88043838&z &l=0&m=h

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Take a look at this product. If you happen to call them to talk about different types of application, talk with Dan. Their product has been around for 25+ years and going strong! www.stucoflex.com
Good Luck
Chuck B ~
On Fri, 26 Jan 2007 09:08:01 -0800, Larry Gagnon

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