Repairing Drywall Seams

I recently removed wall paper and after a few hot water baths and washing the glue off. I painted the wall. After the paint had dried, it revealed two bad horizontal seams in one of the stairwell walls. The seams are slightly rounded to the point that it is visible in any light. What is the best way to repair this? Mine out the seam, sand down the edges and repair it with tape and mud??
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

sand it down a bit, go over it with joint compound top coating with a 16 trowel & "float" out the bump. other options include adding wainscot, chair rails, stucco, ect
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's what I had to do. I tried the floating out with a large knife and trowel...but in the stairwell, and the way the light hit the wall...it really stood out. After the steps you mentioned, it know looks acceptable. I really don't know how the drywall crew could of YUCKED a simple seam like that up so bad but the did. Rather than mine out the whole seam, you could take a hand rasp, knock off the protruding mud, and a bit more, then re-tape and mud.
On one seam, I was successful in getting to the level of the mud, and with a small spray bottle of water wetting down the tape and removing the tap from the seam....level it off re-tape and move on.
Good luck,
DAC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DAC wrote:

Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Paul wrote:

Horizontal seams in the stairway can be a problem since the drywall often crosses the rim joist between floors. When the joists dry out (or if there is significant seasonal moisture change) the wood shrinkage/movement is enough to cause the drywall to crack or bulge. Or both.
You can try repairing the seam and see how it holds up through a few seasons. If it buckles or cracks again, you'll either have to live with it or install an expansion joint.
If you want to try to fix the seam, carefully scrape off the paint and mud as you can, being careful not to damage the wallboard itself. You can loosen up the mud (assuming it wasn't a setting type mud) by wetting with a sponge. Keep wetting and scraping until you're able to remove the paper tape. You can then re-tape and mud it even with the existing wall. (It's a lot of work, but adding another layer of tape and mud over the existing joint would likely create a noticeable hump in the wall.)
Chair rail moulding is also worth considering.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike Paulsen wrote:

Just a thought/question, as I am in the process of looking at floor tiles and saw something about flexible grout, and we used touse a paintable caulk in a shop where I worked. Is there something like a paintable/flexible caulking compound or anything that might help here? I realize that if the caulk stretches, then even paint that is well adhered to it is going to chip/flake/peelor something...But thought I would ask. Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You ask a good question. I have used paintable caulk in my drywall repair when I removed the texturing from the ceiling and in the process nicked or poked through the paper corner tape. a good flexible caulk over the slit seemed much better than re-taping the whole seam.
My thought would be to save the caulking for small cracks and where there's a definate bulging of the seam tape...I would suggest redoing the seam.
DAC
Rugburn wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.