Remove 13 ft. bearing wall - Beam choices?

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On 4/24/2008 10:46 PM Smitty Two spake thus:

I think you meant to type "shear". But your points stand.
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Yep, thanks. Not too many homonyms fool me, and that's a bad one to get wrong since it changes the meaning of the word. Shear it is, and I'll remember it.
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Robert Allison wrote:

You miss the smiley? Hope not... :) It was only intended as a joke, not an aspersion...
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dpb wrote:

No, I saw it. I just wanted to be clear to everyone else. I figured that you knew what I was talking about!
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Unless someone else has fielded this
W6x9 means a wide flange beam nominally 6" deep & weighing 9 lbs/ft
cheers Bob
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"Robert Allison" wrote in message

That sounds like a good idea. I can tear out a foot or so of the drywall on the ceiling on either side of the bearing wall and remove a foot of drywall on the side walls both directions. Then take pictures of everything including the crawl space under all this. Then provide this along with measurements to the engineer.
Note: Under all this is are TREE TRUNKS! This is an old house built in the 1930's. For support beams under the house... Under each outside wall and under each bearing wall, there is an entire 11 inch round tree trunk with the top side sawed flat and pier supports under it. Actually there are already pier supports at both ends of where the bearing wall ends (Where supports for a beam would go).
The 2nd floor (1st floor ceiling) has closely spaced 2 x 4 joists resting on this bearing wall (the 2 x 4's span 10 ft.). And not evenly spaced either. I don't think this is enough support (I would think 2 x 6's would be better), but the house is still standing - just "creaks" a bit when walking upstairs!
Note that the upstairs sub-floor is nailed into these 2 x 4's with zillions of nails. So ripping out the 2 x 4's and replacing with 2 x 6's would be fun!
I understand that I would need to support everything on either side before removing the bearing wall and that I would need to transfer the load down through the subfloor.
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On Thu, 24 Apr 2008 07:06:07 -0700, "Bill"

People who rip out load bearing walls are normally idiots. The wall was put there for support and is intended to stay there. If you want a visual of the next room, put in a few smaller windows so only every other stud is removed and beef up those that stay.
People who think that a house is going to remain solid and survive in severe storms leave their houses with their original structures. Only those Saturday morning home re-make shows knock out load bearing walls to create lots of open space. Of course the tv viewer never sees the house a few years later when the roof sags, or sees what occurs during a tornado.
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On Apr 25, 4:51 am, snipped-for-privacy@nonetoday.com wrote:

An excellent example of frontier gibberish spoken with the conviction of someone who has no knowledge of construction. Aspiring trolls please note.
R
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On Apr 25, 1:51am, snipped-for-privacy@nonetoday.com wrote:

They could very well be idiots but normally? No.
Modifying a structure after it's built is not that dissimilar to modifying while it's still in the design phase....though one needs to use constrcution tools rather than a keyboard or an eraser.
>>>>The wall was put there for support and is intended to stay there.<<<
Yes that is (was) true when the house was built.
But as long as one determines the required structural capacity & replaces (or in some case because of code changes, increases it) the structure will be fine.....that's why we have design folks. :)

Improperly done, wall removals can weaken a structure but done properly you'll wind up with a structure that is as strong usually stronger due to increases in capacity demanded by the code.
cheers Bob
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