Rafters are separating from ridge board.

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Hello, I recently moved into a 1929 Craftman Style house where the collar beams have been removed from at one end of house to provide for attic storage. I recently noticed that the rafters are separating. I need the storage space, so does anyone have any suggestions on how to reinforce that end of the attic so the rafters do not continue separating from the ridge board?
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hurricane clips. go to the lumber yard & tell them your problem

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longshot wrote:

Hurricane clips will do absolutely nothing. A lumber yard does not provide engineering advice.
R
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Put the collars back or replace the ridgeboard with a supported ridge beam designed by someone who knows what they're doing. Don't forget to get a permit. If the separation is extensive you probably have damage at the walls where the thrust force is at work too.
--


MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.ca
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Yeah, don't forget the permit. Jeeeezzzzeeee..... to nail up one board. PLLLLLLEASE..
--
Steve Barker


"Michael Bulatovich" < snipped-for-privacy@dont.try> wrote in message
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It's not the nailing, it's the approach that would appear to need some review. The unsupervised DIY'ers have already shown their competence on this job by causing the problem.
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MichaelB
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It's stupid to trade off a building's structural integrity for a little additional storage space. You are killing your house. There are no bandaid solutions.
Reinstall the collar ties (they are not beams even though in some areas that is what people call them). There is no other choice. You should do this yesterday, if you catch my drift.
Have a pro take a look at it before you start DIYing. DIYing is what caused the problem in the first place. By pro, I mean engineer, architect or an experienced contractor.
You should look along the exterior walls where the interior walls intersect them. If there are cracks forming, you need an engineer.
R
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In a previous post snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote...

I concur with both Rico and Michael. You have placed the structural integrity of your house in jeopardy. Hire a local professional engineer to review the situation and to make recommendations before the house collapses around your ears.
--
Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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Lets get real here. If the rafters are separating from the ridge, I would suggest you contact the airlines and have them see what that roof has to make it lift up. They will buy the idea. Any that I have seen seem to push down and get tighter on the ridge. What you described, the way you described it, can't happen. Is this a hoax?

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Glenn wrote:

The bottom of the rafters' plumb cuts pull away from the ridge as the walls spread apart. The top of the plumb cuts stay in contact...until they don't, and then you really should be anywhere else than under the rafters.
Winter. Snow loads. Wind not partially blocked by tree leaves. Needs to be addressed immediately.
R
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maybe they were shitty cuts to begin with , do you have any documentation over a long period of time to show how much movement there has been, & under what conditions?
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Good point, Most likely, the rafter have just shrunk in length. The floor joists in my 1871 home had shrunk all the way off the large nails holding them.
--
Steve Barker



"Glenn" < snipped-for-privacy@kc.rr.com> wrote in message
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wrote:

Wood does not shrink in length to any degree that you could notice. Wood shrinks radially and tangentially - width and depth. The rafter shrinks along those two shrinkage planes. Since the plumb cut is on an angle with the top restrained, some of the shrinkage has the effect of shortening the lower part so the bottom of the plumb cut opens up a bit. This is normal and expected.
I don't think this is the case in the OP's situation since they've only noticed the gaps in the area where they removed the collar ties.
R
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These have opened further in a few years. Not shrinkage.

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drill a couple holes insert some shackles, hook up a come along & pull them back in place & put up collar ties or even metal strapping to keep them intact. it really doesn't make sense that the rafters would push away from the ridge unless maybe it was jacked at some point in the past. maybe it had a sag & someone jacked it up to replace posts or such. hope it helps.
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See RicodJour's explanation. The rafter bottoms come out as the tops come down.
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I bought the house in 1982, renovated it, which included leveling the floors and replacing a large section of the foundation near the end where the separation is. The attic was used as storage when I bought it. I did not notice the maybe 1/4 inch separation until I moved into the house this February, after I renovated it again. This renovation I applied stucco and again did some foundation work on the other side (north) of the house where the original foundation work was done. I also put 2x8 rafters on the storage side of the house to support the load and new drywall throughout. I had replaced the original roof and 4 other layers of roof two years ago and the house is in so.cal so I don't have a snow load problem. After 6 months I have noticed drywall nails (4) popping out slightly on the north side of the house. Could this be related to the same problem of the ridge? Your idea of pulling the rafters back or just supporting them seem ideal if I it would work by doing it, say 5 feet from the ridge or 6 feet from the attic floor. What do you think?

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Yup.
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On Nov 22, 6:19 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Without seeing the situation firsthand, and not knowing if the gaps are widening, I would advise you to attach collar ties to opposing pairs of rafter, every other pair, about 1/3 of the way down from the ridge. Generally five 10d nails into each rafter at each end. This will prevent the rafters from continuing to separate.
Keep an eye on the situation, and pay particular attention to the wall/ceiling and exterior wall/interior wall junctions for signs of cracking. String a very taut line under the ridge board, spaced down from the bottom of the ridge a half inch or so, equal on both ends. Measure down to the line at each pair of rafters and see if the ridge has sagged where you removed the collar ties. If you have a good eye, you can sight along the bottom of the ridge to get a qualitative idea of the amount of sag.
If there isn't any cracking in the drywall and the bottom of the ridge if pretty straight, you've probably caught it in time. Learn to duck under the collar ties.
R
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