QUESTIONS


I have a 5 year old home just west of Houston, Texas. I've noticed cracks in the sheetrock (drywall), almost exclusively along the sheetrock tape, where two pieces have been joined (I have angled ceilings). There are almost no wall cracks - just ceilings. Would appreciate opinions from those who know. I'm struck by the fact that the tape lines are cracked, in some case so straight, it appears as if a ruler was used to make the crack line. Thanks - Brian.
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It sounds like they used paper tape and the tape pulled away from the drywall. If your house has roof trusses they didn't allow for the movement. Google "roof truss uplift" and see if that's what you have going on.
R
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wrote:

It sounds like they used paper tape and the tape pulled away from the drywall. If your house has roof trusses they didn't allow for the movement. Google "roof truss uplift" and see if that's what you have going on.
R
The OP said he had long straight cracks not tape falling off...Two different things...And paper tape had nothing to do with it....It is fine to use..I agree it is probably truss movement...I bet it wasn't strapped either....Only one way to find out for sure....A little exploratory surgery might be in order...
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I didn't say paper tape wasn't okay to use. It, like every other drywall tape in existence, has its benefits and disadvantages. But the OP wrote, "it appears as if a ruler was used to make the crack line" If the crack was ripping through the tape, the line wouldn't be that straight. If it's not ripping the tape, and there's a straight crack, then the crack is appearing at the edge of the tape. Which either means the mechanic bedded the tape with too little compound, or there's a lot of ceiling/roof movement, but you're right about investigating a bit further.
To the OP: are the cracks an inch or so away from where the wall/ ceiling angle is, or right in the center of the transition? Since you said that your ceilings are angled, it's possible that you don't have trusses and the movement isn't going away - it's a natural movement in response to changes in temperature and humidity throughout the year.
There are drywall tapes that are made to flex and are less likely to create cracks. Benick will tell you which ones he likes for that application.
R
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wrote:

I didn't say paper tape wasn't okay to use. It, like every other drywall tape in existence, has its benefits and disadvantages. But the OP wrote, "it appears as if a ruler was used to make the crack line" If the crack was ripping through the tape, the line wouldn't be that straight. If it's not ripping the tape, and there's a straight crack, then the crack is appearing at the edge of the tape. Which either means the mechanic bedded the tape with too little compound, or there's a lot of ceiling/roof movement, but you're right about investigating a bit further.
To the OP: are the cracks an inch or so away from where the wall/ ceiling angle is, or right in the center of the transition? Since you said that your ceilings are angled, it's possible that you don't have trusses and the movement isn't going away - it's a natural movement in response to changes in temperature and humidity throughout the year.
There are drywall tapes that are made to flex and are less likely to create cracks. Benick will tell you which ones he likes for that application.
R
There is no such thing as joint tape that flexes that I've ever heard of or ever seen in any of the drywall supply places I've been to...If you're thinking of flex tape for corners like Ultraflex 450 then you misunderstand what it's for...It means the tape will flex to fit any angle corner inside or out...The tape doesn't flex after it's mudded on...It is a structural laminate tape that becomes part of the structure...It is VERY strong and only for corners...To expensive to use on all corners though(60 bucks for a 100 foot roll)...I just use it on inside and outside 45's and such...There is however compound that will resist cracking..It's called Sheetrock Brand Durabond Setting Type Joint Compound..I have used it for the first coat on all my jobs for the last 15 years or so...I bet the ceiling wasn't strapped.....Usually if you have "edge cracking" you can see loose or wrinkled tape in places like where the joint meets the corner as well...But it's possible.It is probably just mud cracks which are very straight too....Either way the only "real" fix is re-doing the ceiling from scratch with new drywall after it's strapped...Anything else won't last 1 year.....It's a moot I point I guess as the op has disappeared...Just another drive by question with no additional info or follow up...
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