question about rebuilding a brick chimney

My dad hired a tuckpointer to rebuild a brick chimney, maybe a little larger than typical residential as it services a small multi-unit building built in the 1920's. The width on all sides is 4 bricks of standard size. The original chimney was about 25 courses of brick and about every 5th or 6th course the bricks would be turned sideways to tie the inner and outer layers of brick together.
I went to look at the job today. About 10 or 12 courses of brick are in place and none of the bricks are turned sideways.
The top 6 courses of brick were single layer, and his worker had told me he'd be putting the inner bricks in place later. Sure enough, the tuckpointer says he lays about 6 courses of outer brick, then lays the inner brick, and tying it together with wire.
I'd like to know if its acceptable practice to rebuild a brick chimney in this manner, and if so, is it preferable to rebuild it in the original manner (with some of the bricks turned sideways.) TIA
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I'm not a builder but have been involved with the construction of my own house...
That sounds like standard construction for a cavity wall (here in the UK at least) the wire is called a "wall tie" and I believe in the UK the codes (regulations) require it to be stainless steel to prevent it rusting. Earlier versions of our regs allowed galvanised steel.
There is a possible reason for doing it this way instead of using tie bricks....tar/oil deposits can form on the inside of the chimney if you are burning wood. This can soak right through bricks and stain plasterwork. It won't cross a cavity wall tie though. Make sure he keeps the cavity free of "snots". He should really knock off any mortar that falls into the cavity and lands on a wall tie bridging the cavity.
On a new cobstruction we would probably use a pumice block liner on the inside instead of brick as this is a better insulator. An insulated chimney runs hotter and draws better with fewer deposits forming. The alternative is to build in brick, then insert a stainless steel liner and fill the void around it with some form of special fireproof insulator.
I'm reasonably sure similar thinking will apply in the USA.
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> On a new cobstruction we would probably use a pumice block liner on the

chimney
is
PS Steel liners can be fitted to existing chimneys. They aren't usually fitted during construction (at least not over here)..
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I did not mention that there is an existing clay or terra cotta exhaust pipe already in place, the bricks are laid around it. This is a three story structure.
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Horizontal joint reinforcing is o.k. I would like to know how the inner brick is placed. Six courses is about 16 inches deep, so it sounds like he is not placing the brick carefully. There should have been a specification or careful description of the work. T
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wrote:

Inner brick is being placed by reaching in. The bricklayer on site told me he lays some outer courses first so that it will be straight. Scaffolding is set in place, so its not hard to reach down six courses.
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wrote:

I'm not sure I like the idea of tying together with wire when doing a chimney. I'd worry about problems with corrosive gases causing early failure in the wire.
but that is an IMHO...
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inner
Chimney liners are also made of stainless steel....
http://www.stovesonline.co.uk/wood_burning_stoves/Flexible-Flue-Liners.html
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On Thu, 1 Nov 2007 16:47:34 -0000, "CWatters"

And my stainless chimney liner is a wonderful thing... (But those ty wires probably are not stainless...)
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wrote: > >

I don't know about the USA but here in the UK they should be stainless.
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Well, I went to the jobsite this morning, and the inner layer was not level with the outer layer! The worker on site told me he'd get the layers even by cutting down the last row of bricks... OMG!
The contractor came by a little later and tried to convince me that tying together the layers would be fine. I explained they were uneven. When I asked how he would tie them together, being they were uneven, he started yelling at me asking what I knew about bricklaying. Then literally stacked bricks on the ground to show him what I meant by uneven.
Then he threw up his hands and said he'd be taking down the chimney and doing it again. I told him I wanted it done with stretcher bricks every sixth course, which is the way it was originally. Fortunately, I took several pictures of the chimney before it came down, and gave him a couple of pictures so he could see what I meant.
Another thing his worker did, was to stack the bricks dry. These are the original chimney bricks, over 80 years old, so there is some deterioration. I asked him why his worker didn't spray the surface of the bricks to moisten them, he said the mortar holds better on a dry brick... That doesn't sound right to me.
So, since old bricks with some spalling are being reused, do I still want them moistened before being mortared?
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Check the BIA (Brick Industry Association) web site. Technical notes are useful. T
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(1) Why did you hire a tuck pointer to do a bricklayers job? (2) When he started yelling at you, why did you not fire his ass? you are paying him to do a job for you. Don't take any shit from your hired help.
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