Pool nightmare

Page 2 of 3  
On 6/23/2011 4:36 PM, Steve Barker wrote:

Well, I'll admit there are some areas where a basement isn't practical. But then again, most of those places are not an area where I'd care to build a house anyway.
And plenty of people build houses in areas where NO houses should be allowed, absent a signed and recorded waiver of EVER getting public assistance when (not if) mother nature destroys them. Sandbar islands, the sides of mountains, bottom land less than 3 feet above the mean water level of the river or ocean a half mile away, or actually below sea level, etc. (I think it is criminally stupid that they are rebuilding the low-lying parts of New Orleans. It WILL flood again. Spend the money to buy them out, and build a New Ninth Ward on the high side of the lake, and set up a cheap shuttle bus service so they can get to their jobs.)
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
aemeijers wrote:

What jobs?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Barker wrote:
...

Perhaps (perhaps not). It's certainly nonsense to claim every locale should include one. Clearly you've not suffered through the issues in the areas that aren't well-suited and that would require well more than some minimal extra cost for intial consturction and high probability of problems down the road...
"Commonsense" is to make decision based on local conditions and other contributing factors such as budget constraints and/or occupational use as opposed to claiming one size fits all from a keyboard...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 21 Jun 2011 09:21:18 -0500, Steve Barker

I don't know about foundation codes. Never saw a basement in Florida. Think you hit water after a couple feet in much of the state. In other places where's no water table issue, some developments build or offer to build slab houses to lower costs and make them affordable to more people. Years ago I had a workmate who bought such a slab house. A basement would have added about 20% to the cost. He regretted not ordering the basement. Then if you can afford a big ranch, there's no need for a basement. I've always had a basement, and most homes around here have them, but not all. It's a natural plus because lots generally aren't big enough to spread out a big ranch. One good thing about basements is they're quiet, and cool in the summer. A bad thing is they can flood.
--Vic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/21/2011 10:39 AM, Vic Smith wrote:

There is always a need for a basement. Supply lines and ducts in slabs or crawls SUCK, as does HVAC and water lines in attic spaces.
Down in western Louisiana, where I spend a couple weeks a year and own property, current fad is to build concrete basement, build house above it, then build up the lot to create a house on a hill. Only rich folks can afford that extreme, of course, but it works- flood protection, and nice cool breezes on the veranda.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I never paid any attention to the mechanical systems when I've been in a slab house. I've read stories of tearing up the slab because of leaking water supply. Seems having the water supply come through a wall should take care of that. A sewer line going bad is bad news even with a basement. I was surprised to see they put HVAC and water lines in attics in some parts of the country. All the slab houses I've been in have a utility room for HVAC. HVAC ducting in the attic shouldn't be a problem.

Best way to do it, as long as you have enough land to get a reasonable slope up to the house. A woman I worked with was having leg problems before she retired. Her husband was too. She told me if I bought another house, just get the biggest ranch you can afford. No stairs anywhere. Though I've always loved my basements, there's some merit to that.
--Vic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

With the equipment thye have these days they very seldom tear up a slab because of a leak. My inlaws had a slab house in NM. Had a pipe leak. The plumber had a detector and they cut a hole about 8" by 8", fixed the pipe, filled with concrete, and put th eflooring back down. Done in a day.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 21 Jun 2011 18:56:04 -0500, Vic Smith

Not usually a huge deal. Sewer lines can often be repaired without even digging them up. Sure, it's not the piece of cake it is with full access to the pipes but it's not a big disaster, either.

With no frost, why not? My HVAC ducts for the first floor go between the floors and in the attic for the second floor (heat pump for each).

No utility room. The air handler for the first floor is in a hall "closet" and the second floor's is in the attic space, along with the water heater.

Yes, in KY they did that, where possible. The houses built into hills like that were about 50% more than the other houses in the same subdivision.

That's what my wife wanted. Our current house has a couple of bedrooms and bathrooms upstairs and I'm building my workshop over the garage (where a "bonus room" would be.

I really wish I had a basement but only one house (of perhaps 50) we looked at had a basement. They are quite rare here.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jun 22, 11:31pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

I occasionally regret not having a basement too but then I remember that most of the basements I have visited were full of stuff that should have gone out in the trash :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

After a few interstate moves, we've learned not to be pack-rats. ;-) I'll cost me a fortune to move my tools next time, though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Any place I've been to down there near the Atlantic or Gulf the ground is sand and shells right under the grass. My dad lives a bit west of Ocala, about 40 miles from the Gulf, and there's mild hills there. Ground is still sandy with shells. Somebody mentioned Phoenix not having basements too. Probably a lot of solid rock. Basements are probably more cost-effective when you can dig them out with a back hoe. If you have to blast, maybe it's best to not have basements, and spread out and up instead.
--Vic.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Vic Smith wrote:

not too much real rock. caliche instead. that requires blasting usually.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I don't have any, but always browse similar - they're better now - postcard racks while my wife looks for stupid souvenirs for the kids. Florida postcards beat Jackalope postcards every which way but loose.
--Vic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
aemeijers wrote:

Florida has several things to commend it, not the least of which is no state income tax. VERY many of our troops who will be deployed overseas for a year change their state of residence to Florida (or Texas) for this very reason.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/21/2011 10:21 AM, Steve Barker wrote:

1. Most in Florida!
2. Steve, this house is in Florida, where NO houses have basements. Crawlspaces are not favored either for many reasons.
--
I'm never going to grow up.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am under the impression that most houses in Wildwood, NJ do not have basements.
--
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@donklipstein.com)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 22 Jun 2011 03:54:20 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@DonKlipstein.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

I think that goes for any location near the shore. All of Florida is near the shore! Been to the Jersey shore twice this spring so far, the whole state is sand. A few miles past the PA state line into jersey you just start seeing sand for ground.
Makes me want to be a heavy equipment operator in NJ. It would be like like playing in a giant sand box. Leave the rock drill and TNT at home, just put on the biggest hack'n bucket you got and start digging.
Remove 333 to reply. Randy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

With no frost, why a deep foundation?

It's a *lot* more than a couple of thousand. An unfinished basement generally runs about 1/3 that of finished above-ground space. ...IF a basement is even possible.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/22/2011 10:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

In the area _I_ live in it's not much more to make 9' walls as opposed to 4' walls. I guess it makes a difference where you are as has been pointed out. 4' walls are a minimum here for below the frost line footings and a reasonable crawl space. Going another 5' is just a matter of a couple hours digging and a few more yards of concrete, and a floor.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Sure. My last house was in Vermont, where the frost went down 7-8' some years. As long as you're down there anyhow a basement is cheap. If the frost only goes down 6" in a bad year, as where I live now, not so much. There is good reason they don't do basements in Alabama.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.