Plumbing codes question


I don't know if anyone can help but if so it will be greatly appreciated.
I posted previously about the lack of proper sleeving used on the copper pipe in my slab.
In talking to the state board of licensing I am told that in the non-incorporated areas of the state of Texas in 1998 that the plumber had the option of using the following 3 codes: The Southern Standard Plumbing Code, Uniform Plumbing Code and the National Standard Plumbing Code. Can anyone tell if all or any of them allowed this practice or did they all require "minimum 25 mil" sleeving or similar?
Thanks,
Gary
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In 1998-Texas-nonincorporated areas, there was no state building or plumbing code. Only incorporated areas had building codes.
If the home was "in-the-county" there were no building or plumbing codes that could be legally enforced unless a code was specified in the contract between the contractor and owner.
Consult and attorney.
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MikeP wrote: ...

I'd say that would be county-dependent...<surely> some counties in (even) TX had county-wide zoning/codes by 1998???
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says...

In TX, counties do not have the power write or enforce building codes per the state constitution and laws. Some property may be in the county but under the extraterritorial jurisdiction of an incorporated area (city) and subject to the city's codes.
I *think* (do not know for sure) that TX counties do not have the power to create or enforce zoning laws. This is one reason why large developments tend to spring up just outside of a city's extraterritorial jurisdiction. FWIW, the small city of Helotis TX recently tried to stop a big-box-store from being built just outside it's city limits ... nothing Helotis or the county could legally do to stop it.
FWIW, TX as of Sep 2003 has a statewide building code. Cities can have their own, as specified by state law. Counties can not pass a law or ordinance requiring a different code .... BUT a county by default has the code which is in force in the city of the county seat. It gets even more confusing when it comes to which electrical code is in force. I left out a lot of detail, its all on-line at www.texas.gov
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NEC is electrical code in Texas, as of 2002. The remainder is IRC. The code year specific is the year date of NEC and IRC are the most recent prior to that year. IRC 2000 for instance.
The name of the town is "Helotes".
Statewide building code was effective Sep 2002.
Municipalities must use applicable year NEC and IRC as basis for their local building codes per Texas law. Counties have control over health issues, like septic systems in rural/non-municipal areas regarding residential homes.
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Lil' Dave wrote: ...

Interesting...
I knew they were fairly loose (am in SW KS but it's <60 mi across OK panhandle to TX panhandle so it's close) but figured they would have made some changes--here, cities can control up to 3 miles outside the city limits and counties <can> enforce other requirements besides the purely health-related ones (but the latter is a relatively recent change)...thankfully, we're outside the city jurisdiction so there are no unreasonable restrictions on the farm operation...
To add at least something approaching on topic, unfortunately as I was hoping for OP, there doesn't appear to be much recourse against builder other than "best and usual practice" arguments if he chooses to pursue him legally...(assuming, of course, that the Cu being buried directly in the slab was the cause of the problem)... :(
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MikeP wrote:

posted was correct. There were three codes that the plumbers could use but they did have to meet at least the least demanding of the three codes.
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Well, I think the person you talked to is incorrect, unless the "in-the-county property" was in the ETJ of a city, at the time the work was done.
Have the board back up their statements in writing, citing the appropriate state law. Good luck.
http://www.tsbpe.state.tx.us/complaints /
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