Number of layers on roof

Does anyone know what the maximum number of layers on a roof is in NY (Long Island)? Is there a code for this and if so where could I find it?
Thanks in advance, Peter
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The Residential Building Code of New York State permits a maximum of two layers of roof shingles.
--
Jonny



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Thanks for the information. Since I am going to buy a house with three layers (less then one year old last layer), which is leaking, is the current owner obligated to tear off the old layers and put on a new roof or can he simply repair the problem?
Also is there any buidling code number that you know of?
wrote:

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The answer to your question depends on the provisions of your Contract. If you have not already signed one, insist on a Contract provision requiring a NEW roof, with full removal of all existing layers of shingles.
--James--
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If the leak was disclosed before you made your offer, then the seller is _probably_ not obligated to fix it.
If the leak was discovered or disclosed after your offer was accepted, then _probably_ you can back out of the contract if its not properly taken care of. Sometimes a price adjustment is substituted for a repair. In a state like NY I suspect that a repair would have to be to code (2 layers) but its hard to imagine someone wouldn't remove all three layers at that point.
Any real estate lawyer can give you the specifics.
S
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Thanks. The contract states that the roof must be free of leaks. I am just wondering if the 3 layers could be a problem for me (since there are leaks) and I am wondering if the owner must make the repairs according to code (which I have now found the actual code for). The owner says they will repair the problem. I want to make sure that I don't get stuck with code violations and ideally have the owner repair the roof properly i.e. new roof if nneded by code (or money so I can put on a 1 layer roof). I will be talking to my lawyer but I wanted to see if anybody out here has experience with this since my lawyer might not know about construction codes.
Any suggestions are welcome.
wrote:

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Apparently, you're aware of the 3 layer shingle roof. And that did not happen without providing same information to you. Sounds like a disclosure to me.
No. The owner is not responsible for a roof that may have been grandfathered by current code for the State of New York. Seldom is passed building code that is retroactive. New construction is a different matter, or changes made after the building code was enacted and enforced by the local municipality regarding roof repairs. Assuming you buy the home, you inherit the grandfathering until you have to repair the roof by replacing shingles. Then, the two layer maximum is the rule. If the house had the current 2 shingle layer maximum, you'd still have to strip the shingles for repair or replacement. So, don't see why this is an issue. But, I'm a KISS method kind of guy. Could have easily overlooked something.
--
Jonny
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The NYS code was updated more than one year ago so if the roof is only one year old, it was put on illegally. I'd get the roof torn off and replaced if possible or back out of the deal. If it's only one year old and leaking already, you will be replacing the roof in a year or two. Do you want a $5,000.00+ repair bill next year ?
--
JerryD(upstateNY)



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Peter wrote:

Maximum allowable used to be three layers, now it's two layers maximum.
Maximum personally witnessed layers was four.
R
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I knew of one house that had five. Big old house had overhangs I was working on that were 25' off the ground. Three inch roofing nails, I had never seen roofing nails that long before.
An aside. There was a gutter guy applying standard gutter on the fascia. I had bridged over the built in gutter that was leaking. Anyway this was a 12-12 pitch roof, way the hell up in the air and he walked on the roof applying the gutter. The shingles were sort of springy,being so many layers. He would actually walk to the edge and standing up straight legged, bend over the edge and nail the gutter that he was balancing. I have never seen anything like that before or since.

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Make that about 35' high. I remember using 40' extension ladders stretched almost out and I was using ladder jacks and 2 x 10 planks to walk on. (Nervously) I was working alone and I can't remember for the life of me how I got those planks across those ladder jacks. I must have man handled them as I was a lot younger then and stupider too.

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