nibs on wall after painting

Hello to all:
I have a quick question regarding what I might have done wrong painting the upstairs bedroom closet.
To start, enlarged the closet, so new drywall went up. Put 2 coats of drywall primer on, then 2 coats of water-based paint. Wall is not really rough, but does contain a few nibs when you run your hand over it. Wall was fairly smooth after the drywall primer that was put on with brush. Paint was put on with a good quality medium nap roller. Paint was semi-gloss variety.
It's not a big problem as it's the inside of the closet so nobody will see it, but wondered if anyone could comment as to what I might have done (or not done)correctly.
Should I have lightly sanded after the first coat (or perhaps before the first coat)of paint? Or perhaps this is a roller issue?
I would entertain your ideas before I tackle the rest of the bedroom.
Thanks, ------------------------------------ Stripes23
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 05 Aug 2011 17:46:35 +0000, Stripes23 wrote:

One thing you could try. SOS pads. Get the soapy ones. Soak them good with water then rub over the nibs.
I did this on some primer paint on metal and that took the nibs out while leaving the primer intact and giving it a more finished look.
Or use 400 or better, sand paper, wet. Do it by hand.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The OP is not asking about primer problems, and specifically states that the primered wall was smooth to the touch. You can't sand latex paint and achieve good results.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I'm not sure if you should entertain my ideas - probably better just to accept them blindly. ;)
I've had drywall primer that left a surface that was almost like sandpaper - I had to screen sand everything before painting. It was just bad paint. It's possible that the paint or primer dried too fast and trapped little air bubbles grew bigger with each coat of paint. It's possible that the roller cover was new and you didn't wash it out before using it (cheaper roller covers leave lint behind), or that you didn't wet out the roller cover fully with paint (trapped air bubbles again).
Examining an individual nub closely would help determine the cause.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 10 Aug 2011 10:21:06 -0700 (PDT), Rico dJour wrote:

Good points. What if one had use a roller not designed for latex? Or perhaps even not cleaning the old paint thoroughly from the roller before the next use? Like letting it sit over night.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.