New photos of our house

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"Pat"> wrote

I installed the 5.1 in-wall system in my house back in 2002 when it was under construction. They were the good ones, none of that plastic stuff. During the framing there were steel mounting boxes installed between the studs. Then in the trim phase the speakers were installed after the sound baffles were inserted. The baffles caused 90% of the sound to come out of the front.
Incidently, did you know there are basically 2 types of speakers. Infinite Baffle and Bass Reflex. You can tell them apart visually by observing whether the speaker cabinet has a *blow hole* on the front, which lets the bass sounds resonate forward. If it has a blow hole its a Bass Reflex speaker. Infinite Baffle speakers have no blowhole and rely on the sealed cabinet to force the bass to the front. Infinite Baffles seem to have a tighter sound to the low end.
How to test a speaker: Play Boston's "Smokin'" song and listen for the part where the dood rolls the drums downward. Crank the volume as loud as you can stand it and hold a lit zippo lighter 4' in front of the speaker. When the drummer hits the lowest drum the zippo should blow. If not, box that junk up and take it back from whence it came and beat the sales doods ass.
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Please post some pictures of the paint drying.
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in your picture of the hot water heater / water softener, please tell me that white vertical plastic pipe to the right of the heater (that looks like $hit) is not a gas line !
if it is, you need to have whoever did that shoddy job to do over.
if it's a suction line for the salt tank, make them do it over anyway, it looks like $hit !

http://www.mynewoldhouse.com/house/article/67/Choosing-a-Hot-Water-Heater-and-Water-Softener.aspx
http://www.mynewoldhouse.com/house/article/66/Preparing-For-Drywall-Finishing-With-Red-Paper.aspx
http://www.mynewoldhouse.com/house/article/68/Cutting-Holes-In-Drywall-For-In-Ceiling-Speakers.aspx
http://www.mynewoldhouse.com/house/article/69/Cutting-In-And-Other-Painting-Fun.aspx
http://www.mynewoldhouse.com/house/article/65/Italianate-Cottage-A-New-Old-House-In-Charlmette,-Louisiana.aspx
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It probably should be galvanized pipe or at least metal hose. I don't like the idea of pvc foe gas lines
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Look closer - The gas line should enter on the left side of the gas valve. It is open in the photo, so gas line isn't run yet.
BTW, Galvanized isn't code in my area, but black pipe would be.
JK
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Galvanized isn't code for what? Code doesn't say galv is not allowed on gas, it's just not preferred.
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Steve Barker




"Big_Jake" < snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com> wrote in message
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Quick hijack question - is black pipe black because of rust protection - i.e. as in gun blueing or parkerizing. I understand the difference between blueing and parkerizing by the way, but I didn't have the proper term for it off the top of my head.
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Depends on where you live. I know for a fact that the town where I work will not approve galvanized. http://www.inspect-ny.com/plumbing/gasfaults.htm#gasfaults6 Safety warning: Check condition of flexible gas line connections: Caution: we do not pull out appliances to look at gas line connections, but you should do so, checking condition of flexible connections for leaks and assuring that a shutoff valve is installed. Watch for leaks in those flex-connector lines between gas line and the appliance as they are thin wall and often corrode and leak. Gas leaks are dangerous. Safety warning. Flexible soft copper piping has been used to supply municipal (natural) gas to the ... electric clothes dryer. ... hot water heater. ... heating system. This is not a recommended installation and it may be prohibited by local codes - "black iron" steel piping is required in many jurisdictions.
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I don't see the reference to "galvanized".
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Steve Barker




"Edwin Pawlowski" < snipped-for-privacy@snet.net> wrote in message
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Read the last line. It does not say galvanized is not allowed, but does say black is preferred. As I said, it is not allowed by our local inspector in MA, but it may be in your town. I don't argue with our local guy as it is easier to do what he wants.
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wrote:

Galvanized is not allowed for gas in my area. I am in SE Wisconsin. I am pretty sure that flex stainless lines are also a no-no for us on water heaters. Here we see mostly black pipe, and occasionally flex pipe such as Wardflex(tm) for "snaking" through floors and walls.
JK
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Can you cite the code or provide a link for that?
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Steve Barker




"Big_Jake" < snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com> wrote in message
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wrote:

No. As far as I know, WI is one of the only states that hasn't (or isn't) adopting a more universal code for plumbing. I'm sure that poking around the web enough I could find and cite the code, but it is likely a WI only thing, so what is the value to the group as a whole?
JK
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They used CPVC for the gas line to the water heater. IIRC, CPVC is not rated for gas, and I'm pretty sure the valve is not. You really want to check on that before you have a gas leak etc.. Normally black iron pipe or yellow flex is used.
Also, the picture isn't that good to see detail but the galvanized piece that comes out of the right side up toward the top, that should be a T/P relief valve, is it?
If not that's as dangerous as the wrong gas line material. There is supposed to be a water line from the T/P valve (I don't see one, just the galvanized pipe with something black on the end?) with plumbing down toward the floor or to the outside so that hot water can exit the tank to relieve pressure/temperature build up in case of emergency where the water is heated too hot or the pressure exceeds the limit. Otherwise the water heater tank explodes.
You need to check both for code compilance and proper material and a T/ P valve.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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The cpvc is actually a return line plumbed into the drain cock port. The gas line hasn't been run yet.
here's a larger view.
http://www.mynewoldhouse.com/house/images/HotWaterLRG.jpg
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Steve Barker




"Gary Slusser" < snipped-for-privacy@ptd.net> wrote in message
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I agree with Gary, there needs to be a T&P valve on the tank that is piped to the floor. I'm not sure which room you are in or which code your jurisdiction uses, but I suspect the hot water tank needs to be on an pedestal that gets the flame over 18" off the floor.
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The 18" thing only applies to when it's in a garage area.
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"DanG" < snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net> wrote in message
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"DanG"> wrote but I suspect the hot water

Whats the reason for that? Mine is sitting in an overflow pan right on the floor.
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I could not tell from his picture, it is required for garage installations. Some inspectors are liking the idea so much they prefer it on all installs. Has to do with explosive, heavier than air, vapors. We even have one that wants electric 2 1/2 gallon ones elevated.
Galvanized pipe is a no-no for gas.
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And it is inspectors like these that cause trouble. When they make their own rules, where does it stop? And the galvanized pipe is strictly a "not recommended" thing. It's not against code.
To elevate an electric water heater is just stupid and ridiculous. The whole point is to prevent gasoline vapors that could possibly gather at the floor of a garage from igniting on a GAS unit. Any other unit, and any other place, it's ignorant to elevate it.
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