Mounting 2 x 4 to block wall ?

Page 1 of 2  
I want to mount a PT 2 x 4 to a cinder block wall in my basement, in order to build some shelves.
What is the best way to do this ? These shelves may hold a max of 100 lbs.
I have seen those lead "sleeves" which I suppose you screw lag bolts into. Is that the best method ?
Are there other products which are easier to use ?
I do have some mortor bits, so I am guessing that I can drill into this wall ok. I don't think it is poured solid at this place in the wall.
Thanks for any tips.
James
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No lead anchors and lags are not the best for hollow masonry, those are good for solid slabs. For hollow cinder block I would not use any anchor that expands in its hole. I would rather use a butterfly (or mushroom style) molly bolt so as not to crack a block with a hole expanding anchor. Better to have an anchor that expands on the other side of the hole like a mushroom or butterfly molly. Quarter inch bolts should be fine for 100lbs on 16-24 inch centers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

No lead anchors and lags are not the best for hollow masonry, those are good for solid slabs. For hollow cinder block I would not use any anchor that expands in its hole. I would rather use a butterfly (or mushroom style) molly bolt so as not to crack a block with a hole expanding anchor. Better to have an anchor that expands on the other side of the hole like a mushroom or butterfly molly. Quarter inch bolts should be fine for 100lbs on 16-24 inch centers.
I agree with RickH. Toggle bolts would be best for hollow block. 1/4" or larger should work fine. You just need to drill your holes in the hollow areas. If it is real cinder block you can drill with a masonry bit and a good drill. However if you have cement block you will need a hammer drill.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
James,
Take a look at toggle bolts when you next enter a hardware store.
Dave M.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I'd plan on it holding 500 - but that's easy.

I like Tapcons- http://www.concretefasteners.com/anchors-fasteners/tapcon-screw/installation.aspx
Get the ones with a hex head. Pick up a 1/2 hammer drill for about $50 and you'll love these things. Clean the hole out well with the bit-- use a hex driver to seat them. [the last few boxes of 25 (50?) that have I bought came with the right size drill and a hex driver.]
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tapcons are your friend.
s

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Very good responses from all, thanks !!
Whether I use blue concrete screws or a toggle type molly bolt, do these products come with a long enough screw so as to go through a 2 x 4 , and still have enough length to screw into the anchor or molly bolt ?
James
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

the Tapcons come up to 6" long. http://www.concretefasteners.com/anchors-fasteners/tapcon-screw/installation.aspx
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I would even consider Liquid Nails and a few fasteners from a Hilti Nail Gun (powder charge) You can rent one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

...unless the wall has been painted.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
i like pl construction adhesive more than liquid nails, i find it to be superior on masonry. -c

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
what is pl construction adhesive ??
---------------------------------
i like pl construction adhesive more than liquid nails, i find it to be superior on masonry. -c
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

that is good stuff.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I used the plastic anchors and all purpose (sheetrock) screws to fasten 2x2 to non-vertical/non straight block walls. Insulated between with 1" styro foam sheets and sheetrocked. Did that in 1/2 the basement. Looks great and still ther with no problems 20 years later.
I also built shelves using nothing but the shelf brackets, plastic anchors and all purpose screws. Also still there after 15 years.
I don't have anythign heavy stored on those shelves (yet) but the brackets are the heavy duty ones and I would have no qualms about loading the shelves heavily.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Harry K wrote:

A lot of people think the load is torque - not so. Most of the load (98%) from bookshelves and the like, is straight down, not out. If, in the OP's case, the 2x4 backing sits on the floor, a piddly bit of string will hold a couple of tons of books in place. (I exaggerate, but not by much).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

really? put a 12" shelf on the wall and put the weight on the front edge. the load is almost all torque.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Never mind HeyBub. Every so often, he posts messages when he's sober. That wasn't the case with the message you responded to.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
message

I was going to pass on torque but here it shows up 3 times. Torque is twisting motion. I believe you mean tension for pulling out and shear for the sliding down motion. [g]

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
charlie wrote:

they will support most of the weight. Think of a hundred lb weight hanging on a 2x4 in free air, just your hand holding it from falling over. It will not require 100 lbs of effort on your part to stop the 2x4 from falling. the force you are exerting is not vertical, the 2x4 takes care of that. You effort is only opposing the overbalance of all load being on one side.
HeyBub may have been sober all along.
Of course the OP could add 2x4s to the front of the shelves as well and have a device that would not require any attachment to his walls at all.
LdB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK, so suppose your 100 lbs of weight is from a shelf bracket supporting a shelf 1' wide. Let's take the worst case, that all the weight is at the front of the shelf. Then that's a moment of 100 ft-lbs.
If the shelf bracket has two fasteners into the 2x4 that are 1' apart, then the load on the top fastener is 100 lbs of tension. If you are holding the 2x4 5 ft from the ground and have the bottom end against your foot, you have to apply a tension force of 20 lbs.
Now if the 2x4 is glued to the face of the masonry wall, and is 8' long, then a tension force of 25 lbs at 4' from the bottom gives 100 ft-lbs. If the adhesive is along the entire length of the 2x4, then that's a tension load on the adhesive connection of only 3.125 lbs/ft.
Yours, Wayne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.