Modular Homes Suck!

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Really? Where is that?

On what planet?

On what planet?
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Go to : http://seahawkbuyer.googlepages.com/home for another purchasers story.
modularhomessuck wrote:

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Nice Pics. That factory-built quality is great! Just like a Mercedes Benz, hey Matt!!
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On Dec 14, 8:01 pm, modularhomessuck_at_gmail_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.co (modularhomessuck) wrote:

Several points:
1)    We should have a house lemon law. 2)    This house sounds like the one my brother bought. 3)    I'd like to address Item #7.
Lacking insulation will not cause moisture to form on the underside of the deck. Older homes that have no ceiling insulation remain bone dry. The issue is air leakage up through the house carrying warm moist air or a roof leak. The basement being dry may be because the volume of air flowing up through the house is bringing in enough cool air from out side. As the cold air is raised in temperature the % or relative humidity is decreased. And this keeps the basement dry in the winter. It then takes on the moisture from the basement and what the occupants add. When it exits the structure in the winter the temperature decreases, thus increasing the RH%. If the RH reaches 100% we than have the due point and droplets of water form. This can make an attic wet and cause serious rotting.
Most homes have a variety of holes (1,000's). The plumbing and electrical penetrations in both floor and ceiling of the structure. In a modular home where the two or more sections come together can have a large opening from the bottom to the top. Many think stuffing insulation in the gaps works. Loose fill or batt insulation does not stop air flow. One needs to use a solid material such as, caulk, spray foam, and for large holes use a sheet material (metal, plywood, OSB etc.) and then foam or caulk the edges.
Then there is duct leakage, does your house has ducts? When ducts leak they can be a large driving force, forcing infiltration and exfiltration. If the dominate duct leakage is in the return and they are technically outside the house (may actually reside inside the structure but be technically outside) the house will go positive and push warm moist air out. If the dominate duct leakage is in the supply ducts and they are technically outside the house (may actually reside inside the structure but be technically outside) the house will go negative.
Then there are pressures across doors. Most forced air heating systems have a single return. When a door to a room is closed and the heating system runs it pressurizes the room forcing air out. It takes the path of least resistance. Some of this air leaves the structure, into the attic, walls etc. This then causes a negative pressure in the area with the return is. In turn it gets its air from the path of least resistance. So some rooms are forcing air out of the house while others are pulling air in.
Are there bath and kitchen vent fans and do they actually vent to the outside? Are the seams on the vents sealed? And a bathroom with a window does not count, it needs a real fan. Fans must provide 8 air changes per hour and be on a timer to run at least 20 minutes after the occupant leaves the space.
All of this should be left to the professional. One needs a Blower Door, a Duct Tester, an Infrared camera is also helpful and the knowledge to use them. When one seals leaks in a structure it changes the dynamics and needs to be retested.
When the house is out of balance many things can happen. Natural draft appliances can back draft causing CO poisoning, water heater can, if the pressures are high enough can have flame roll out. Warm moist air can be forced in to cold cavities where the lower temperature can cause condensation and rotting.
Andy W
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Actually IRC section 1102.4 requires ALL utility penetrations to be sealed. This includes DWV & NM Cable holes opening into the attic cavity. These are usually sealed with a can of foam caulk. The joints between major sections, such as that formed by the center mating all would need to be completely sealed at the top and bottom with a foam tape (or similar).
The water condensing on the underside of the deck sounds like a lack of ventilation, but there should not have been any cavity with out insulation.
His best recourse is to see if New Hampshire has any laws on the books to protect him. Some states have enacted legislation which protects new home owners for a period of ten years.
New Hampshire DOES have a MODULAR state building program. It's administered by the Department of Safety under the State Fire Marshal's office (603) 371-3294 was the last number I had for their section. All manufacturer's are required by state law to build within the state's building code
It could prove beneficial for the dissatisfied homeowner to call the State and see what can be done (I'm certain the state will get some action).
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We bought a New England Home,Greenland,NH through their assigned dealer(Atlantic Blue Water Modular Homes; "ABW") back in early 2007. The modular (ranch style 15' x 52') was delivered and placed on the foundation on May 23ed, 2007 and its still not completed. It fail twice by Derry Building Enforcement by a walk thru inspection. The remaining onsite assembly of the modular was just thrown together and wasn't even assembled as outline by NEH site referance manual. NEH only repairs defects that occurs while at their factory. Once the modular leaves the factory which is about 85% completed, you are on your own. So when NEH advertises that their modular homes are quality built from start to finish,as a "turn key" home is hog pog. Think twice before you even think about buying a NEH. I know of 6 or 7 New Hampshire home owners that bought a NEH, which they are experiencing the same and even more defect workmanship and structural issues than we are. If you want to take a tour of this NEH and see for yourself, just call and setup a free tour.
Firewoodguy.com -- Firewoodguy
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Sorry to hear about your bad experience, If it's any consolation, I know people who had similar experiences with brand new site built homes and manufactured homes falling apart on them in their first year.
Charlie Camp Atlantic Mortgage Satellite Beach, Fl http://www.atlanticeloan.com/default.aspx
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