Milwaukee = Ryobi?

Page 1 of 4  
<http://www.ttigroup.com/business/brands.php?PHPSESSID ÷fbd3dd60bdf5aa3e07dae 76124a967>
The design may be different, but they are manufactured by the same Chinese factory.
Reluctantly, I'm taking Milwaukee off of my preferred list of tool makers. (It's getting pretty short!)
Sparky
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not so...see
http://www.milwaukeetool.com/us/en/about.nsf/vwPages/headquarters-and-facilities?OpenDocument

Suit yourself, but it's a shortsighted and uninformed choice.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.milwaukeetool.com/us/en/about.nsf/vwPages/headquarters-and-facilities?OpenDocument Er:
http://www.ttigroup.com/customPages/Milwaukee.php?PHPSESSID ÷fbd3dd60bdf5aa3e07da76124a967
Quote:
Techtronic Industuries acquired the Milwaukee. brand and businesses in 2005
TTI (HQ'd in Hong Kong) _owns_ Milwaukee. And, AEG, Ryobi, Hoover and Dirt Devil.
Then from
http://www.milwaukeetool.com/us/en/about.nsf/vwPages/headquarters-and-facilities?OpenDocument
Quote:
Milwaukee's power tool and accessories are also manufactured to its exacting standards in modern facilities in Europe and throughout the world.
I think "throughout the world" probably includes China.
As with most consumer products, there really are only a few companies making them. There's often quite a difference between the brands. Other times, none at all.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.ttigroup.com/customPages/Milwaukee.php?PHPSESSID ÷fbd3dd60bdf5aa3e07da76124a967
http://www.milwaukeetool.com/us/en/about.nsf/vwPages/headquarters-and-facilities?OpenDocument
And that may or may not matter. Just because it is made in China does not mean it is low quality.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On May 9, 1:48 pm, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

And from the link I previously posted -quote -
"Milwaukee is headquartered in Brookfield, Wisconsin, which is also home to research, new product development, manufacturing support, marketing, sales and information systems. It has modern production facilities in Greenwood, Jackson and Kosciusko, Mississippi; Blytheville, Arkansas and Matamoros, Mexico.
Milwaukee's power tool and accessories are also manufactured to its exacting standards in modern facilities in Europe and throughout the world. In 2001, the Milwaukee brand was launched in Australia by Milwaukee's sister company AEG, located in Winnenden, Germany and was re-launched in Europe and the rest of the world in 2002. ..."
I didn't say the were _only_ made in US, and, if you'll note the quote you posted includes the key world "also". It's pretty clear the products for SE Asia/Australia/etc. markets are produced outside the US and the European are at least partially produced there.
If you'll also look at the TTI web page you'll find a message that brand loyalty and identification is a key business strategy and that they have a very deliberate idea of marketing to the full range of customers and price ranges as an overall company and that all products are not designed for all markets.
Search for a thread only a few weeks ago where I posted a significant more detailed analysis in response to another poster's questions about Milwaukee. There's quite an interesting story in there as I learned while doing quite a bit of research a year or so ago in order to evaluate the company as investment opportunity/merit...they're not the ordinary stereotypical "Chinese startup" kind of outfit by any means despite having some production in China and Ryobi being their initial product...
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
...

Sorry, didn't say that right -- they started supplying products primarily to Sears, then started the Ryobi and generated the sweetheart deal w/HD with it and parlayed that into what they currently are rather than Ryobi first. But they knew specifically what market they were after w/ Ryobi and it wasn't/isn't Milwaukee's...
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If I may sound off on this one, Personally where the tool is manufactured weighs in little for me. As much as I would prefer to buy American or Canadian, (keep our boys working) QUALITY will be my sole decider. I know China has meant, and in some cases still means cheap crap and deeper still human rights issues, etc. But the world is headed in that direction. And better and better stuff keeps coming from that manufacturing juggernaut know as cheap labor China. Often they are our companies, exploiting the labor cost difference. Anyway that said, I have been a BOSCH fan for years. I've recently been displeased with a few of their newer tools, but the Mitre Box for example, well... IMHO ,I dont think theres a better one on earth at any price point. I love mine.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jack wrote:

Unfortunately for those w/ that as a primary criterion, a major fraction of purchasers apparently have PRICE as the sole decider, which allows the poor quality stuff to succeed in the market place. :(
My point to OP wasn't really about China per se, but a particular company and a false assumption.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As a retired contractor, I have always sworn by Skil too. Got a battery drill sometime ago at Lowes that is a beauty. It was on special for about 40 bucks. Wish I had my 40 back. Used it 4 times, ie charged it 4 times and the charger won't work any more. The store manager of that department said the charger would probably be almost as much ad I paid for the whole thing and they sold a bunch of them and he said everyone is just throwing them away.
So much for Skil and so much for Lowes.

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Glenn wrote:

Skil has been mostly junk for quite a while. You only noticed this lately?
They still make the worm-drive circular saw though, and it's still good.
Chris
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Been retired for 18 years so haven't bought much lately.
I had 2 of the older battery drills and 4 batteries for them. My people used them every day, all day. Usually had one or 2 bats charging during the day, 1 hr charge. We used and Pounded them for years and they never failed. Batteries took a memory finally and I replaced the bats once. Shame a good Co goes to crap.

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have been through several Skill, Craftsman, and Black Decker cordless tools over the past few years and been rather disappointed in all of them. Nine months ago I bought a combination set of tools from Ryobi and couldn't be happier with their performance. The overall qualitiy of the tools is good and their performance has been well above that of the previous tools.
I bought them partly because of the price but more important to me was the value. By that I mean that I compared both price and quality, not one or the other. That is what you should be looking for when making any purchase. There may be better tools on the market but if their price is too high compared to their quality they don't represent a good value. Likewise, cheaper tools may be of such low quality that they are not a good value either.
When purchasing any tool or other product the ultimate value is based on usage. I purchased a tile saw several months ago for $199 from Harbor Freight. It was far from the best saw available and was also not the cheapest saw available. I knew that I only had two or three projects that I would be using it for over the next year or two. The first thought was to buy one for $75-$100 or so but examination showed that they would probably cost more in poor cuts and wasted tiles than they would save. They were not good for more than a tile backdrop in the kitchen.
I looked at top of the line saws and found them to be great quality and would last through years of commercial use but their price to use value for me wasn't there. So, I ended up buying an inexpensive saw with more than enough value that was probably build in China but gave me exactly what I needed, the best value for the dollar spent.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I once bought a little 1/4" no-name drill because I wanted the RPM's of a little one. Got it at the lumber yard for something like 10 bucks. We used that little thing for years and the drill head bearing is so worn out that you can wiggle the chuck around but it still runs well.

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
...

Well, w/ those as comparatives, you're in at least the same general range of target market. TTI of course, began as a manufacturer for Sears/Craftsman and then built the Ryobi brand and got the distribution deal w/ HD from that experience/basis. While I haven't looked in detail for several years now, it would be surprising to find they're not still making a fair amount of stuff for Sears. I've not investigated the Skil/B&D actual manufacturing relationships enough to know of any possible connection in production facilities although one would presume they're not contracting for them, even that wouldn't be out of the realm of possibilities.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was talking with a plumbing company the other day who was also using Ryobi tools. Caught me by surprise that they would be using them since their load demand would far exceed mine. I ask them if they were happy with the tools and the quality. Their answer was that while the tools were not as good as say the Dewalt brand, their cost was so much lower that they could by three or four and still save money. Their experience had shown about 3/4 of the use at 1/4 of the cost. Still seems like a good value.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The cost ratio would seem high although could believe the use/ longevity might be roughly correct. Of course, one could get the cost ratio to that point if comparing a K-Mart/Walmart-purchased homeowner tool to a tool purchased at the plumbing distributorship.
Every business owner/contractor/etc. has to work out what is the most cost-effective tool management program for their particular situation. I know those who use the same "throw-away" scheme and others who "buy best". In those instances, what is the difference primarily of the ones I'm thinking of is the types of crews they have-- the "cheap but cheery" guy uses hourlies while the "pricey but strong" guy has long-term employees. I hypothesize the labor and the personal proclivities of the individuals has as much or more to do w/ the longevity of the tool as the tool itself.
I simply compare how as an employer I have tools which I have owned/ used for in some cases 40 years that a particular hand has been able to destroy (or nearly so) in a half-hour before it was rescued. Otoh, others are also able to operate with impunity the same tool doing the same job.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, you don't have to be too old to remember when 'made in Japan' was a synonym for piece of crap. That period went by pretty quickly, in retrospect.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Agreed. The shift is well on the way with Taiwan and Korea now, and it _will_ happen with China too. The end result being high wages and a certain amount of stagnation/regrouping as they meet or exceed where we are now (in wages, QoL, prices etc). Question is whether our economies will survive the phenomena with China, or instead, whether it's our turn next.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On May 15, 2:45 pm, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

Of course our economies are going to get clobbered. The only thing keeping our salaries and benefits and way of life as high as they are is geographic isolation; the money is over here not over there, we are over here, therefore we have more money. Thanks to modern communications and transportation, that isolation is greatly reduced. Eventually things will stabilize, but we're not going to live long enough to see that period. In the meantime, it's going to be a bumpy ride. Like when the industrial revolution displaced agriculture, or when mechanization replaced hand labor.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Given that the US trade deficit in 2005 was $728B and is still increasing, you seem to be doing your best to move it over "there" :-(
It'll stabilize, but it'll be bumpy getting there, and I have my doubts whether you're going to be happy with the stabilized level.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.