Metal Connectors for Wooden Posts

Hello,
I have a couple questions about metal connectors (e.g. Simpon Strong Tie connectors) that are used with wooden posts.
First, I often see post bases set in concrete which have two straps extending upward to connect to opposite sides of a post (e.g. Simpson's CB series). About what axises, if any, does such a connection have the ability to resist moment? How about lateral loads at the base?
Second, I also see caps for a post-beam connection which have a square plate sitting between the beam and post, with a pair of legs folded up around the beam and an orthogonal pair of legs folded down around the post (e.g. Simpson's BC series). These resist lateral forces parallel to the beam; how about lateral forces perpendicular to the beam? And what about moments?
Lastly, is it possible to use these or other metal connectors to design a wooden moment resisting frame?
Thanks, Wayne
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do u have a pic of building ?
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My questions are mostly theoretical, but if you like consider a small gazebo without any diagonal bracing.
Cheers, Wayne
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Most of the metal connectors have little if any rated ability to handle moments. The connectors that do have such a capability are special order and far heavier construction than the typical connectors found at the Borg.
Simpson's tech support is quite helpful - give them a call if you have questions about a specific connector and its load capacities.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

I am trying... to ... resist....aaaaahhhhh! Failed!
A beam walks into a bar. Bartender says; What'll ya have, buddy?
Beam says; Just give me a moment.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
  Click to see the full signature.
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Wayne-
I happen to be sitting here doing the newsgroup thing with a SImpson catalog in my lap.
One of my (many) gripes about Simpson is that their post bases listed in the catalong have no rated moment capacity.
I cannot find my latest catalog so I'm using the 2005 one.
Every one of the seven models / families of post bases in the 2005 catalog have this note:

rotating about the base and therefore are not recommended for non top-supported installations (such as fences or unbraced carports).<<<
Yeah, years ago I had the same questions about the Simpson PB's. Seemed like they should have some rated moment capacity (at least in one direction) but according the catalog, no.
They have an extensive online catalog & you can get the load info (but you have to dig hard in some cases). But sometimes I find the catalog confusing & unclear.
Patio covers, carports & gazebos typically are required to have knee braces to generate lateral stiffness (ie joints moment capacity)
The last time I needed post base moment capacity I designed myself a moment resisting PB. Funny thing, it got kinda big even fabbed out of welded angle iron & pipe.
Answering your second question(s)
No moment capacity & it appears that the catalog is silent about transverse lateral load. Another one of my gripes about Simpson, changes to the catalogs result in lost information. I think the older catalogs used to have that info but my old ones are packed up somewhere. The PBS's have bi-directional load values so if you compare the post caps these bases you could infer a transverse load. If you need a real hard number you'd have to give Simpson a call.
The answer to your last question>>>>> a wooden moment resisting frame?
Could result in a fair amount of controversy / debate. IMO it is "possible" to design a wood moment connection / frame but it isn't normally done nor is it easy to assure the desired performance.
Rico-
I know that SImpson does custom stuff but I didn't know they made any moment resisting PB's
cheers Bob
cheers Bob
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Yeah, I've noticed that, it is still true in the 2007 catalog. But I see the post bases used all the time locally for fences. So people are relying on the unspecified moment capacity of the post bases, knowingly or unknowingly. Will that unspecified capacity be greater for resistance to rotation in the plane of the strap, or for rotation in the plane of the unstrapped faces of the post? I guess in the plane of the strap.

What did it look like?
Cheers, Wayne
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