Max weight bear the side of a building

Please excuse for my lack of technical English here.
In a building which is 15 meters wide, which is declared as being able to bear 500Kg per square meter, I suppose that this value refers to the center of the building, right?
If we want to put heavy weights within 2.5 meters from the side of the building (which is where beams are sustained, by external walls), can we put more? How much more?
Is there a way to determine if we are putting too much weight? E.g. if I can measure that the floor is not bent (a bead put near the weights does not move) can I be reasonably sure it's ok?
Thanks in advance
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It appears that you have a floor rated for a uniformly distributed load and want to add point (concentrated) loads. I suggest an engineer evaluate the problem. T
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Bau, You will need advice from someone who can see the problem. I'm not doing real well converting weights and measures. It sounds like your building is 45' wide - I really doubt that this is a clear span condition even in steel or concrete. What are the joists made of? Do they really clear span 15 meters?
The load bearing you reference has to do with uniform loading of 1100 lbs on about 9 square feet or about 100# per SF which is very high loading. Joists are usually designed to deflect l/360 or about 1.5 inches at mid span, another reason to wonder about the length and deflection limits.
Joists seldom fail catastrophically, they usually deflect an unacceptable amount. IF you want to measure deflection use a laser, string, or accurate measurement from the floor below at mid span. I don't think a bead rolling will be accurate enough to give you any information. If the joists are 45 feet and you are concentrating a load at about 7.5 feet, you are least throwing the load in the outer third - a safer plan than mid span.
As has already been said, the best advice would be a structural engineer that can see the issues. You've not given nearly enough information for anyone to make an intelligent guess.
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We don't, as you point out, know anything useful about the structure. The lack of useful information suggests the O.P. doesn't know enough to do the job himself. T
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FYI. rule of thumb Meter = 3 1/4 ft. Sq. M = 10 3/4 sq ft. Close enough for guvment work.
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