Lubricant for Glass Sliding door tracks ?

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wrote:

Graphite will make a gunky mess. Any lubricant is the wrong approach. The door needs to be fixed properly meaning it must be removed from the track the rollers replaced. It should be done soon as more wear can ruin the track completely.
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wrote:

ditto,
If the rollers stall and tear up the track your problems are just starting.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

My parents had a sliding glass door at their house - when they bought the house it was in really bad shape and would barely slide. The eventual fix was not only replacement of any suspect rollers but renewing the lower track. Somewhere my dad found a stainless U-channel for just this purpose, it would snap over the existing track and provide a new, smooth (and harder than the original aluminum) surface for the rollers to ride on. The original track was so badly worn that we had to fill the stainless U-channel with something - I don't remember what, but possibly silicone? - to make up the difference in areas where the rollers actually rode. Worked beautifully with no maintenance until maybe 10-15 years later when they decided to replace the sliding door with new french doors.
nate
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Messy. I'd suggest clear silicone spray.
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wrote:

If the door is scraping the track, you may be able to just raise it up higher by adjusting the rollers. There's a hidden screw in the hole at the bottom at aach end. CW is up, iirc.

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Silicon Spray. It doesn't attract dirt and has no chemical residue. Much the same as powdered graphite. & on that note, make sure your door rollers are properly adjusted. #1 cause of hanging sliders. #2 is dirt/foreign objects in the tracks. Never ever use oil based products, such as WD-40. They attract & HOLD dirt particles.
Dan

tried
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Dan Deckert writes:

Silicone.
Just what is in your imagination about this stuff?
It's a type of oil, you know, just not a mineral, animal, or vegetable oil. Certainly it attracts dirt. And if you don't have any residue of it, then what exactly is the point?
Many "silicone" sprays are 99 percent mineral spirits and other hydrocarbon stuff with a whiff of actual silicone oil. That's why it doesn't attract dirt or leave a residue: it just evaporates after making you feel better.
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face=Arial size=2>...</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>&gt; Dan Deckert writes:<BR>&gt; = <BR>&gt; &gt; Silicon Spray. It doesn't attract dirt and has no chemical residue.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Silicone.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Just what is in your imagination about this stuff?</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>It sure beats oil based lubricants such as WD-40 by miles. Experience alone, living in a desert w/sand/dirt for 20+ yrs. indicates otherwise.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>&nbsp;<BR>&gt; It's a type of oil, you know, just not a mineral, animal, or vegetable oil.&nbsp; <BR>&gt; Certainly it attracts dirt.&nbsp;</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Really? An OIL? &nbsp;Then how do you&nbsp;describe/ascribe to&nbsp;the following? I'm not aware of ANY OIL that will sustain 5905 degrees F to a boil point!</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=640 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD width=20><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD vAlign=top align=left width=450> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=450 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD class=datnm align=middle width=450> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Silicon</FONT></DIV></TD></TR> <TR> <TD height=7><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD align=left> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD class=dathd><FONT face=Arial size=2>Atomic Number:</FONT></TD> <TD width=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>14</FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR> <TR> <TD height=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD align=left> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD class=dathd><FONT face=Arial size=2>Atomic Weight:</FONT></TD> <TD width=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>28.0855</FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR> <TR> <TD height=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD align=left> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD class=dathd><FONT face=Arial size=2>Melting Point:</FONT></TD> <TD width=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>1687 K (1414C or 2577F)</FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR> <TR> <TD height=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD align=left> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD class=dathd><FONT face=Arial size=2>Boiling Point:</FONT></TD> <TD width=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>3538 K (3265C or 5909F)</FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR> <TR> <TD height=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD align=left> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD class=dathd><FONT face=Arial size=2>Density:</FONT></TD> <TD width=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>2.3296 grams per cubic centimeter</FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR> <TR> <TD height=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD align=left> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD class=dathd><FONT face=Arial size=2>Phase at Room Temperature:</FONT></TD> <TD width=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>Solid</FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR> <TR> <TD height=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD align=left> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD class=dathd><FONT face=Arial size=2>Element Classification:</FONT></TD> <TD width=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>Semi-metal</FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR> <TR> <TD height=7><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2> <BR></DIV></FONT> <DIV> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD class=dathd align=left><FONT face=Arial size=2>History and Uses:</FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV> <DIV> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=640 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD> <P class=history><FONT face=Arial size=2>Silicon was discovered by Jns Jacob Berzelius, a Swedish chemist, in 1824 by heating chips of </FONT><A href="http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele019.html "><FONT face=Arial size=2>potassium</FONT></A><FONT face=Arial size=2> in a silica container and then carefully washing away the residual by-products. Silicon is the seventh </FONT><A href="http://education.jlab.org/glossary/abund_uni.html "><FONT face=Arial size=2>most abundant element in the universe</FONT></A><FONT face=Arial size=2> and the second </FONT><A href="http://education.jlab.org/glossary/abund_ele.html "><FONT face=Arial size=2>most abundant element in the earth's crust</FONT></A><FONT face=Arial size=2>. Today, silicon is produced by heating sand (SiO2) with </FONT><A href="http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele006.html "><FONT face=Arial size=2>carbon</FONT></A><FONT face=Arial size=2> to temperatures approaching 2200C.</FONT></P> <P class=history><FONT face=Arial size=2>Two allotropes of silicon exist at room temperature: amorphous and crystalline. Amorphous appears as a brown powder while crystalline silicon has a metallic luster and a grayish color. Single crystals of crystalline silicon can be grown with a process known as the Czochralski process. These crystals, when doped with elements such as </FONT><A href="http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele005.html "><FONT face=Arial size=2>boron</FONT></A><FONT face=Arial size=2>, </FONT><A href="http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele031.html "><FONT face=Arial size=2>gallium</FONT></A><FONT face=Arial size=2>, </FONT><A href="http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele032.html "><FONT face=Arial size=2>germanium</FONT></A><FONT face=Arial size=2>, </FONT><A href="http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele015.html "><FONT face=Arial size=2>phosphorus</FONT></A><FONT face=Arial size=2> or </FONT><A href="http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele033.html "><FONT face=Arial size=2>arsenic</FONT></A><FONT face=Arial size=2>, are used in the manufacture of solid-state electronic devices, such as transistors, solar cells, rectifiers and microchips.</FONT></P> <P class=history><FONT face=Arial size=2>Silicon dioxide (SiO2), silicon's most common compound, is the </FONT><A href="http://education.jlab.org/glossary/abund_com.html "><FONT face=Arial size=2>most abundant compound in the earth's crust</FONT></A><FONT face=Arial size=2>. It commonly takes the form of ordinary sand, but also exists as quartz, rock crystal, amethyst, agate, flint, jasper and opal. Silicon dioxide is extensively used in the manufacture of glass and bricks. Silica gel, a colloidal form of silicon dioxide, easily absorbs moisture and is used as a desiccant.</FONT></P> <P class=history><FONT face=Arial size=2>Silicon forms other useful compounds. Silicon carbide (SiC) is nearly as hard as diamond and is used as an abrasive. Sodium silicate (Na2SiO3), also known as water glass, is used in the production of soaps, adhesives and as an egg preservative. Silicon tetrachloride (SiCl4) is used to create smoke screens. Silicon is also an important ingredient in silicone, a class of material that is used for such things as lubricants, polishing agents, electrical insulators and medical implants.</FONT></P></TD></TR> <TR> <TD height=7><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV> <DIV> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD class=dathd align=left><FONT face=Arial size=2>Estimated Crustal Abundance:</FONT></TD> <TD width=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>2.82105 milligrams per kilogram</FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD height=7><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV> <DIV> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD class=dathd align=left><FONT face=Arial size=2>Estimated Oceanic Abundance:</FONT></TD> <TD width=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>2.2 milligrams per liter</FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD height=7><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV> <DIV> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD class=dathd align=left><FONT face=Arial size=2>Number of Stable Isotopes:</FONT></TD> <TD width=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>3</FONT></TD> <TD width=15><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=smalltxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>(</FONT><A href="http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/iso014.html "><FONT face=Arial size=2>View all isotope data</FONT></A><FONT face=Arial size=2>)</FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD height=7><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV> <DIV> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD class=dathd align=left><FONT face=Arial size=2>Ionization Energy:</FONT></TD> <TD width=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>8.152 eV</FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD height=7><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV> <DIV> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD class=dathd align=left><FONT face=Arial size=2>Oxidation States:</FONT></TD> <TD width=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>+4,&nbsp;+2,&nbsp;-4</FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD height=7><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV> <DIV> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD class=dathd vAlign=top align=middle><A href="http://education.jlab.org/qa/electron_config.html "><FONT face=Arial size=2>Electron Shell Configuration</FONT></A><FONT face=Arial size=2>:</FONT></TD> <TD width=5><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>1s2</FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>2s2</FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>2p6</FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>3s2</FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2>3p2</FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR> <TR> <TD class=dattxt><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD> <TD width=10><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>&nbsp;And if you don't have any residue of it, then <BR>&gt; what exactly is the point?</FONT></DIV> <DIV><BR><FONT face=Arial size=2>Really? and the facts/data are?&nbsp; Residue is the shit you don't need after applying a product for a particular need. Weird how it seems to work here in this blowing dirt/sand country.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><BR><FONT face=Arial size=2>&gt; Many "silicone" sprays are 99 percent mineral spirits and other hydrocarbon <BR>&gt; stuff with a whiff of actual silicone oil.&nbsp; That's why it doesn't attract <BR>&gt; dirt or leave a residue: it just evaporates after making you feel better.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Well that's certainly strange, even CRC doesn't list their silicone spray @ 99% mineral spirits &amp; other hydrocarbon&nbsp;<BR> stuff. </FONT><A href="http://www.crcind.com.au/catalogue.nsf /(MSDS)/3055%20808%20Silicone%202007/$FILE/MSDS.pdf"><FONT face=Arial size=2>http://www.crcind.com.au/catalogue.nsf /(MSDS)/3055%20808%20Silicone%202007/$FILE/MSDS.pdf</FONT></A></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>It certainly seems strange that you are seemingly opposed to using silicone spray as a lubricant for a seemingly innocent purpose of lubricating a sliding patio door.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Much less as leading off with mis-information.............just my 2 cents worth...............</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Dan</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV></BODY></HTML>
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Dan Deckert writes:

Surely you're not that dumb.

Did you actually read that MSDS? Sez 90 percent petroleum hydrocarbons.
Thank you for demonstrating my point.
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Silicone is NOT silicon.

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Dear Dan, Please redo your research. Silicon (element) and silicone (chemical lubricant) are two different things.
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Yep. Shot my fingers off on that one............ Dan

http://www.crcind.com.au/catalogue.nsf /(MSDS)/3055%20808%20Silicone%202007/$FILE/MSDS.pdf
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The problem is that an application is only good for a couple of weeks.
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Remove the door from the track and frame. Clean the track with liquid soap and water. Use a toothbrush or similar to get all the debris out. Lay the door on its side. Place something under it to catch any liquid and solid debris. Clean with petroleum distillate. Air dry. Lube the wheel centers with light oil or graphite. Hang the door. Do similar procedure with screen door if you have one. Repeat the procedure as needed when door starts sticking again. If anything is found damaged, replace it. If the door is not adjusted properly, too low or misaligned, correct it. Dave
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As some other posters have stated, lubricating the track is a band-aid approach and should be avoided. The rollers need to be replaced and/ or lubricated. Personally I would replace them since the work to access them for lubrication is the same as accessing them for replacement. There should be an adjustment at the end of the slider near the rollers. Adjust the rollers to retract them in so the slider can be removed from the frame. Once the slider is out remove and replace or lubricate the rollers. Applying lubricants to the tracks will just attract more dust and debris which will create gunk that makes the situation worse. Have fun.
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wrote:

Go to a bike shop and ask for a bottle of 'White Lightning'... Use it.
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James,
It would help, I think, to know what your problem is. If you have sliding glass doors to the back deck and they are sticking, that's not caused by the tracks, so don't lubricate them. You should remove the doors, locate the wheels, and clean or replace them. The "how to" books at your local library will explain sliding glass doors.
Dave M.
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James wrote:

Is the door intended to slide, or are there wheels that are worn? We tried all kinds of lube, including graphite, but the solution was in replacing the worn wheels and track. Our doors are very old, and we obtained an insert for the track that essentially makes it like new without removing the original track. Repair guy gave it to us, and it simply screws down over the old track. Grease will just make grit and dirt stick, so it isn't really helpful.
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Lubricate the door tracks with parrafin wax. You can buy the wax at the grocery store...comes in a box of 4 or 5 1 inch thik slabs about 3 inches by 5 inches..... just ask a clerk or stockboy where it is.
Ive been doing this for 20 years.... forgot how I found out about it....dont really care..... its easy...last quite a while....( i do this 2 maybe 3 times a year)...no mess...... makes the door glide smooth as silk
Im not about to tackle removing a sliding glass door from its track to squirt some oil on some rollers......
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Thanks, cornytheclown !! This looks like a simple, straightforward answer !! All that I need to do is to lubricate the track a bit. There is nothing wrong with the door or the rollers....... the door doesn't stick.... .it just needs lubing. I am 100% sure of it.... just didn't know what was the best product that might last a little while.
Out of all the answers, I think the graphite suggestion and the parrafin wax are the most inviting....
Thanks to all who responded !!
James
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