Lightweight siding, walls

Live in a mid 70's single wide right now for almost 2 years now in hte foothills of the Sierras. The structure hasn't leaked yet but its about time we plan a retrofit of the unit. I plan gutting it out and rebuilding from the steel platform up.
THe steel paltform was probably designed for light weight wall sidings that came as original eqpt - aluminum exterial walls with wood paneling inside. TO be on the safe side, I'd like to use lightweight materials so as not to compromise the steel platform. I'll probably reinforce the platform supports as well.
I've done some research and structural steel studding might be the way to go. Talked to rep of northern steel which makes the metal studs and he says that steel studs are about 30% of weight of comparable 2x4'sand 6's and 8's.
FOr exterior and interior siding, any suggestions on what meterials to use. I'd like to make the place look more like a regular home and still have the lightness.
Thanks for any suggestions
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First of all, save the little 2"x4" red, metal , federal certification label, located at the back of the home. You will not be able to sell the home or get a letter of occupancy on the home without it. (Or the original inspection agency will be happy to charge you hundreds of dollars to do a re-certification - if you can get them to do it at all.)
The design of the metal chassis is predicated on many factors. Not if you are simply changing out siding products, you are correct in staying with light-weight products such as aluminum or steel lap. However you could go with brick veneer if you could support the sidewalls properly. One suggestion that would be safe (not knowing what exactly was used in the construction of the mail rails, center cross-members and outriggers) is to support the exterior walls with block piers at 4' o.c.. By doing this you could go with 3/8" or 1/2" gypsum interior and lap or wood siding exterior. (Keep in mind that there is only one edge rail however.)
I would recommend 3/8" OSB under any siding you eventually decide on. For the interior, I would go with 3/8" gyp, taped and painted. You can get high efficiency fiberglass insulations that will still fit in a 3-1/2" cavity of R-13. Floor needs at least R-19 and you can get a high density batt of R-21. For the roof I would consider scrapping out the bowstring trusses and having a local lumber yard that builds trusses built some kingpost trusses with a high heel for additional insulation. Not only would you gain more (and needed ) insulation (a tax write-off) but a shingled roof (think piece and quiet) as well. Go with R-21 at a minimum, and consider going as high as R-30. Ventilate at the eaves and use a continuous ridge vent (can never have too much ventilation.)
Personally I would not recommend steel studs are there are special tools and skills involved in their use. Wood is far easier to use.
If you are going to completely rebuild from the steel platform up, sounds a little drastic, remember the primary purpose of the chassis is for transportation. Most of the loads on the home, once setup, are taken by the foundation system (there is a complex system of load transferal through the outriggers, but that can be overcome with perimeter supports.
Why not just build a new home from the foundation up? You could have a local contractor build the foundation and a modular company build you a weather-tight shell which you could finish over the course of a year. (Better resale and more space.)

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