Learning about buildings: terms, diagrams, types of construction.

I am studying buildings to be a building inspector. I need a source, preferably online, for understanding the names used to describe different parts of buildings, how they are put together, etc. Any ideas?
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Ideas? Oh yes. Get a hammer and saw and go to work for a builder for at least 10 years and then you MIGHT be qualified to inspect other's work.

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Might go to a used bookstore. Look for books on construction, wood framing, architecture, and some college art history books have the names of classic building parts/styles.
Also if you go and watch them demolish old buildings. There is no better way to learn about construction than to watch them tear down old buildings. You quickly learn what is very sturdy and what is not so sturdy. Ask where you would get a demolition permit or ask a demolition company where they are tearing down buildings.
Here is a start for classic stuff. Search on google.com for the words found on the following link and you will find more... http://www.cmhpf.org/kids/dictionary/ClassicalOrders.html

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snipped-for-privacy@hotpop.com wrote:

Why on-line? Go to the nearest HD or Lowes and pick up some books. I was a part-time house builder for about 2 years. I bought a dozen books on construction and renovation so I wouldn't have to ask my boss, "Why are you doing that"?
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Architectural Graphics Standards, hard cover book.
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EXPERIENCE ! I don't know what state you live in BUT ..... Without "hands on" experience (in most states) you can not obtain an inspectors license. If you can get a license without experience please let me know what state you live in so I don't buy a home there when I retire. If you want to get started in the industry check out www.MySturdyBuiltGarage.com (this site is not a joke) and see if you can find the violations. I thought building inspectors were contractors who could not make it in the trade. ;)
snipped-for-privacy@hotpop.com wrote:

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WOW! Thanks for the link!!!!!!!!!
wrote:

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"Not a joke", yet one of the funniest things I've read recently. Funny, that is, because it's not MY garage.
Greg Guarino
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snipped-for-privacy@hotpop.com wrote:

You know how a picture is worth a thousand words? Well, walking through a building under construction, repeatedly, is worth a thousand pictures.
If you're talking about becoming an inspector like those that just use a simple checklist (roof condition - average), then you are not setting your sights very high and will not be adding any great value to your skills. If on the other hand you want to understand how a building goes together, how to diagnose and remedy problems, that takes time and experience. There is no quick way to do it. Read as much as possible, like every book and magazine on construction in your library and check out as many buildings in as many different stages of construction as you can. If you're already working in construction and are looking to put down the tools, that's an advantage, but not a huge one unless you worked in lots of different trades.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Thanks, everyone, for the advice. Sorry I mislead you all. Home Performance Auditor, not even a building inspector. We check combustion appliances for carobon monoxide, ducts for leaks, signs of moisture, and overall energy efficiency; and make recommendations for energy conservation measures. Like an inspector, understanding construction is essential for knowing where cavities are, and what to call things.
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